State of Massachusetts secondary Archives: on Drugs


Charlie Baker: Reduce opioid prescribing and drive Fentanyl off our streets

We began in the midst of an opioid crisis in which deaths, overdoses and prescriptions had been growing by double digits for more than a decade. It was the worst case of negative momentum I'd ever seen. Today, with your help and support, we've reduced opioid prescribing by 29%. And overdose deaths have dropped for the first time in over a decade by 10%. In addition, we have to deal with Fentanyl. Fentanyl was present in less than 30% of overdose deaths in 2014 but was present in more than 80% of overdose deaths in 2017. Federal, state and local law enforcement agencies are working this issue hard. But we have more to do to drive this deadly drug off our streets.

A bipartisan fentanyl bill that makes it easier to arrest and convict dealers and traffickers is in your hands. I ask you to enact it as soon as possible.

Source: 2018 State of the State speech to Massachusetts legislature Jan 23, 2018

Setti Warren: End mandatory minimum sentences for non-violent drug crimes

Criminal Justice Reform: Opposition to Gov. Baker's proposal for new mandatory minimum sentences for non-violent drug crimes: Commonwealth Magazine: "Gov. Baker's proposal to incarcerate more people in response to the opioid epidemic runs contrary to everything we've learned in the failed war on drugs, and to Baker's own 2014 campaign promises," said Warren, the mayor of Newton. "Mandatory minimum sentences do not make our communities safer and they do not reduce illegal drug use. Those are facts."
Source: ORMA questionnaire on 2018 Massachusetts governor race Dec 20, 2017

Bob Massie: End mandatory minimums for low level drug offenses

Particularly happy to see an end to mandatory minimums for low level drug offenses and stricter requirements for race and ethnic data collection of those arrested. Now let's hope that @CharlieBakerMA doesn't block common sense reform and keep laws that harm our communities. We need more action like this if we want to see a fairer justice system.
Source: Twitter.com posting on 2018 Massachusetts governor race Dec 15, 2017

Setti Warren: Combat opioid addiction by funding treatment

Setti Warren is calling on the Republican governor to release money for Amherst's homeless shelter, which he argues is pivotal for confronting the opioid crisis and combating addictions. Warren expressed concern for the decision by Gov. Charlie Baker to freeze the $200,000 earmark for the Craig's Place shelter: "Programs like Craig's Place, and so many others across the state, will be essential to solving the opioids problem," Warren said. "If we don't have the money for these kinds of programs, we should raise the revenue to fund them."

The decision was based on questions about whether there is sufficient money in the state budget. "Since it is the only shelter that does not require sobriety, the staff and volunteers at Craig's Place are also on the front lines of fighting the growing opioid epidemic," Warren said. The governor, he added, should be providing help, not hindering the work and putting the shelter into a state of emergency for no good reason.

Source: Daily Hampshire Gazette on 2018 Massachusetts governor race Dec 15, 2017

Bob Massie: Supports legal marijuana from local businesses

Marijuana businesses and sales [should be] in the hands of local communities and local businesses, as opposed to having some Walmart of dope come in and set up a huge corporate structure that then takes all the money and benefit out of Massachusetts. What often happens is, a wonderful new opportunity comes along, and a big company comes in and occupies most of the sales, and therefore the long-term economic benefits of the revenues and even of the wages go out of state. I think that's a mistake.
Source: WGBH Boston Public Radio on 2018 Massachusetts governor race May 18, 2017

Jay Gonzalez: Support addicts and get them on a path to recovery

Q: If you're elected, how might you address the opioid crisis?

A: This is a huge crisis in our state. It is ruining people's lives. It is tearing families apart. When I was CEO of my health insurance company, (CeltiCare Health) the biggest health problem that people my company served faced was addiction. It was the biggest cause of hospitalizations, drug costs, everything. So we really focused on what can we do differently to help support our members who are suffering from addiction and get them on a path to recovery. There's no silver bullet solution, but we're not doing nearly enough right now. We need to invest in the treatment and support system so that we've got the capacity to address the demand. Part of what's happening is there aren't enough of the right treatment facilities for people to access when they need them, depending on the type of treatment they need when they're in recovery, so they're dropping out and falling off of recovery.

Source: Wicked Local Marshfield on 2018 Massachusetts governor race Apr 21, 2017

Jay Gonzalez: Ok to tweak marijuana law, but the people have spoken

Q: Where do you stand on the legalization of recreational marijuana, and how the legislation will roll out?

A: The people have spoken and we have an obligation as a state to implement the law as passed by the voters. I think we need to implement it thoughtfully, though. We need to keep public safety at the forefront. I do think there's a role for the legislature to play now to review the law and make tweaks to those ends, but I think they need to do it as quickly as they can while maintaining the fundamental premise that was passed by voters.

Q: There's been some discussion about how much control local officials will have over allowing recreational marijuana in their own community. Do you support local communities having more or less control?

A: My personal feeling is that localities should have some level of control, but I would be deferential to whatever the ballot question that was passed says on that point.

Source: Wicked Local Marshfield on 2018 Massachusetts governor race Apr 21, 2017

Charlie Baker: Vigorously oppose recreational marijuana but medical pot ok

Governor-elect Charlie Baker pledged to "vigorously oppose" the legalization of recreational marijuana, even as he plans to move forward with the implementation of medical marijuana.

Supporters of legalized marijuana have already started laying the foundation for a 2016 ballot question to legalize recreational marijuana in Massachusetts. Similar ballot questions passed in Colorado and Washington in 2012.

Baker, asked about the issue in an interview with The Republican/MassLive.com in Boston on Monday, said, "I'm going to oppose that and I'm going to oppose that vigorously, with a lot of help from a lot of other people in the addiction community."

Baker, a Republican, said many people dealing with addiction believe marijuana use is a "significant first step" toward addiction to other drugs. "There's a ton of research out there at this point that says, especially for young people, it's just plain bad," Baker said.

Source: MassLive.com on 2014 Massachusetts Gubernatorial debate Nov 12, 2014

Charlie Baker: Get dispensaries open for medical marijuana

[On medical marijuana], Baker declined to comment on his next steps regarding the licensing process or the provisional licenses granted by the administration of outgoing Gov. Deval Patrick. Baker said he needs to learn more about where the process sits today and about the pending legal challenges. He reiterated comments he made on the campaign trail that he is disappointed the administration did not consult with experts in pain and cancer treatment.

Baker indicated that he will move forward with trying to get the dispensaries open. "I think waiting is a bad idea. There are clearly people who are looking for Massachusetts to get its act together and move forward on this," Baker said.

Baker also stressed his commitment to addressing opiate addiction--which has become a big issue over the last year after a spate of overdose deaths in Massachusetts. The state legislature passed a comprehensive bill aimed at addressing drug addiction by requiring insurers to cover substance abuse treatment.

Source: MassLive.com on 2014 Massachusetts Gubernatorial debate Nov 12, 2014

Don Berwick: Rollout of medical marijuana was a management fiasco

All five candidates also agreed that Massachusetts was on the "right track" after eight years with Gov. Deval Patrick at the helm, but didn't hesitate to describe the rollout of medical marijuana as "fiascos" and management failures of his administration.

All five candidates said they would prefer to wait and see how the medical marijuana experiment in Massachusetts and the new legalization laws in Washington and Colorado work before deciding on legalized marijuana.

Source: WWLP 22-News on 2014 Massachusetts gubernatorial debate Jun 10, 2014

Karyn Polito: Voted NO on earmark for women's substance abuse program

Massachusetts Democratic Party Platform indicates voting YES in Part VI: Safety & Justice:Crime Prevention. [State Rep. Polito, a Republican, voted NO].

Vote on veto override of Section 88 of the FY2004 appropriations. The appropriation in House bill No. 4330 earamrks at least $99,925 for the "Latinos y Ninos" program which addresses the needs of Latino women in substance abuse recovery. The governor's veto message (No. 4365), said "I am vetoing this section because it unnecessarily earmarks the use of funds at the Department of Public Health."

Relevant platform section:Part VI: Safety & Justice: Crime Prevention: "We support increased efforts to work with troubled young people and we support the development of secure substance abuse treatment facilities for adolescents and women."

Source citation: Veto Override, Sec. 88 ; vote number 520

Source: Massachusetts House voting record via MassScorecard.org Feb 10, 2004

Marty Walsh: Voted NO on earmark for women's substance abuse program

Massachusetts Democratic Party Platform indicates voting YES in Part VI: Safety & Justice:Crime Prevention. [State Rep. Walsh voted NO].

Vote on veto override of Section 88 of the FY2004 appropriations. The appropriation in House bill No. 4330 earamrks at least $99,925 for the "Latinos y Ninos" program which addresses the needs of Latino women in substance abuse recovery. The governor's veto message (No. 4365), said "I am vetoing this section because it unnecessarily earmarks the use of funds at the Department of Public Health."

Relevant platform section:Part VI: Safety & Justice: Crime Prevention: "We support increased efforts to work with troubled young people and we support the development of secure substance abuse treatment facilities for adolescents and women."

Source citation: Veto Override, Sec. 88 ; vote number 520

Source: Massachusetts House voting record via MassScorecard.org Feb 10, 2004

Scott Brown: Voted NO on earmark for women's substance abuse program

Massachusetts Democratic Party Platform indicates voting YES in Part VI: Safety & Justice:Crime Prevention. [State Senator Brown, a Republican, voted NO].

Vote on veto override of Section 88 of the FY2004 appropriations. The appropriation in House bill No. 4330 earamrks at least $99,925 for the "Latinos y Ninos" program which addresses the needs of Latino women in substance abuse recovery. The governor's veto message (No. 4365), said "I am vetoing this section because it unnecessarily earmarks the use of funds at the Department of Public Health."

Relevant platform section:Part VI: Safety & Justice: Crime Prevention: "We support increased efforts to work with troubled young people and we support the development of secure substance abuse treatment facilities for adolescents and women."

Source citation: Veto Override, Sec. 88 ; vote number 520

Source: Massachusetts House voting record via MassScorecard.org Feb 10, 2004

Carla Howell: Be scared of the Drug War more than scared of drugs

Q: The idea that drugs would be legal scares a lot of people. Why should it not scare them?

A: The War on Drugs is destroying neighborhoods and ruining families. Drug Prohibition makes it obscenely profitable to push drugs on our children. I encourage parents to find out the consequences of specific illegal drugs and tell their kids the truth: these drugs can ruin your health and your life. Everyone should be frightened of the war on drugs. Itís been a terrible failure.

Source: Eric Darbe, Massachusetts News Jan 5, 2000

  • The above quotations are from Commonwealth of Massachusetts Politicians: secondary Archives.
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2016 Presidential contenders on Drugs:
  Republicans:
Gov.Jeb Bush(FL)
Dr.Ben Carson(MD)
Gov.Chris Christie(NJ)
Sen.Ted Cruz(TX)
Carly Fiorina(CA)
Gov.Jim Gilmore(VA)
Sen.Lindsey Graham(SC)
Gov.Mike Huckabee(AR)
Gov.Bobby Jindal(LA)
Gov.John Kasich(OH)
Gov.Sarah Palin(AK)
Gov.George Pataki(NY)
Sen.Rand Paul(KY)
Gov.Rick Perry(TX)
Sen.Rob Portman(OH)
Sen.Marco Rubio(FL)
Sen.Rick Santorum(PA)
Donald Trump(NY)
Gov.Scott Walker(WI)
Democrats:
Gov.Lincoln Chafee(RI)
Secy.Hillary Clinton(NY)
V.P.Joe Biden(DE)
Gov.Martin O`Malley(MD)
Sen.Bernie Sanders(VT)
Sen.Elizabeth Warren(MA)
Sen.Jim Webb(VA)

2016 Third Party Candidates:
Gov.Gary Johnson(L-NM)
Roseanne Barr(PF-HI)
Robert Steele(L-NY)
Dr.Jill Stein(G,MA)
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Page last updated: Feb 12, 2018