State of Massachusetts secondary Archives: on Tax Reform


John Kingston: Lower tax rates across the board

America must revise its tax code. I support lower rates across the board. I would support efforts to reform the payroll tax, as it impedes job creation and is disproportionately borne by lower wage workers. I oppose efforts to eliminate the deductibility of state and local taxes. I favor a lower corporate tax rate, as we must avoid incentives for companies to relocate overseas or employ elaborate tax-minimization strategies that create little genuine economic benefit.
Source: 2018 Massachusetts Senatorial website JohnKingston.com Oct 15, 2017

Shiva Ayyadurai: Low taxes for innovators & job creators

Money goes where there's a stable economy, low inflation and low taxes. Increasing taxes on those who innovate and take risks to deliver jobs will destroy our system. Our current 35% corporate tax is the highest in the industrialized world.
Source: 2018 Massachusetts Senatorial website shiva4senate.com Oct 15, 2017

Geoff Diehl: Voted against all tax increases

Geoff led the successful ballot question to repeal automatic gas tax hikes--saving us $2 billion. We have avoided 3 gas tax increases due to Geoff. He made and kept the promise to vote against all tax increases. He is the only candidate in the race to have earned a 100% rating from Citizens for Limited Taxation and Government in standing up for taxpayers.
Source: 2018 Massachusetts Senatorial website DiehlForSenate.com Oct 1, 2017

Jesse Gordon: Progressive tax system to address concentration of wealth

Q: Today, we live in the richest country in the history of the world, but that reality means little because much of that wealth is controlled by a tiny handful of individuals. To address that, the wealthy and large corporations must pay their fair share in taxes.

A: Agree.

Candidate's position on this issue: I support a progressive tax system, for income taxes, businesses, and property taxes

Source: ORMA questionnaire on 2018 Massachusetts governor race Jul 31, 2017

Setti Warren: Raise taxes on wealthy; close loopholes

Warren wasn't shy about his willingness to raise taxes, and expressed his support for the Fair Share Tax Amendment, the "millionaire's tax" that will be on the ballot next year, as well as closing loopholes in the tax code.
Source: Foxboro Reporter on 2018 Massachusetts gubernatorial race Jul 20, 2017

Bob Massie: Supports "millionaire's tax" with 4% surcharge

Jay Gonzalez and Bob Massie issued a joint press statement attacking Gov. Charlie Baker for refusing to take a stand on the millionaire's tax, which would impose a 4 percent surcharge on incomes greater than $1 million. It would bring in $2 billion for education & transportation.

Gonzalez said only 19,000 families would be affected by the millionaire's tax, and he argues they would pay a little bit more so the state as a whole would have enough revenue to make badly needed investments in its future.

Massie calls the millionaire's tax a "logical, reasonable first step" to deal with the state's revenue crunch, suggesting more tax increases may be needed later on, particularly if Trump scales back federal support for states.

Massie said Baker's popularity stems in part from his constant hedging. "It's really easy to be popular when you don't do anything, when you don't take a stand," he said. "He has this high approval rating. Why isn't he using it as governor?"

Source: Commonwealth Magazine on 2018 Massachusetts governor race Jun 16, 2017

Jay Gonzalez: Supports "millionaire's tax" with 4% surcharge

Jay Gonzalez and Bob Massie issued a joint press statement attacking Gov. Charlie Baker for refusing to take a stand on the millionaire's tax, which would impose a 4 percent surcharge on incomes greater than $1 million. Its backers say the constitutional amendment, which is scheduled to go before voters in November 2018, would bring in $2 billion for education and transportation.

Gonzalez said only 19,000 families would be affected by the millionaire's tax, and he argues they would pay a little bit more so the state as a whole would have enough revenue to make badly needed investments in its future.

Gonzalez said Baker has repeatedly shown a reluctance to take a stand on issues until he absolutely has to. "People deserve to know where the governor stands on one of the most consequential public policy issues in the state," he said of the millionaire's tax.

Source: Commonwealth Magazine on 2018 Massachusetts governor race Jun 16, 2017

Setti Warren: Eliminate tax breaks; wealthy pay their fair share

Confronting economic inequality is the challenge of our time, and Setti Warren is prepared to lead the way. Despite years of strong economic growth, our state budget is a mess. Fixing it starts with telling the truth: we must raise revenue by eliminating tax breaks for special interests and asking those who make more than a million dollars a year ($20,000 a week!) to pay their fair share.

In 2015, Setti launched DataStat Newton. This program tracks everything from the recycling rate and number of potholes filled to auto-pedestrian accidents and changes in the city's commercial tax base. With DataStat, Setti and his team have been able to make smart, data driven decisions and track outcomes.

Source: 2018 Massachusetts governor campaign website SettiWarren.com Jun 1, 2017

Jay Gonzalez: Fair Share Tax: We need additional revenue for services

Q: You support the Millionaire's Tax [the "Fair Share Tax"]?

A: This is something I think we desperately need. Our governor has said no new taxes. He's taken no position on this ballot question. This is another example of him sitting on the sidelines and not taking a position.

We've got to be honest about the fact that we need additional revenue for our transportation system, the T, for education, for things like what I just talked about in terms of early education and care, which will make a huge difference for families in this state.

I'm being honest with people, we need that revenue. I think this is a fair way to raise it, which is why I support it. We're asking those who've done great during this economic recovery to pay a little bit more so that we can invest in supporting those families who've been having a hard time getting ahead.

Source: WBUR.org on 2018 Massachusetts gubernatorial race May 8, 2017

Jay Gonzalez: Tax surcharge on incomes greater than $1 million

Touting the need for more spending on everything from early education to the MBTA, Gonzalez sounded traditional Democratic themes and said Baker, a Republican who won a narrow victory in 2014 in an overwhelmingly Democratic state, is falling short when it comes to upholding the state's tradition of bold leadership and high aspirations for state government.

He said he supports the constitutional amendment expected to appear on the 2018 ballot that would apply a tax surcharge on incomes greater than $1 million. "I think we need to be honest with people about what it takes to invest in the bold solutions we need to help people get ahead," said Gonzalez.

Gonzalez said he would use the proceeds from a surcharge to ensure universal access to pre-kindergarten.

Source: Commonwealth Magazine on 2018 Massachusetts governor race Jan 30, 2017

Brian Herr: Proposition 2-1/2 tax under-ride: reduce taxes by $1.2M

Selectmen voted Tuesday night to push ahead with a proposal that if adopted, would reduce how much money the town can raise by taxes in the years to come. The 4-0 vote puts a proposed Proposition 2-1/2 tax underride article on the Town Meeting warrant. Still undecided is the amount of such an underride.

Such an underride will permanently reduce the town's tax levy limit.

The maximum amount of taxes the town is allowed to raise under Proposition 2-1/2--the levy limit--is about $55.6 million for next fiscal year. The town is using only $53.9 million of that amount, meaning the town has an excess levy amount of $1.7 million.

The board suggests the underride be drawn from from the excess levy amount, not the town's operating budget. Selectman Brian Herr suggested Tuesday night the board endorse a $1.2 million underride, but members ultimately voted to wait until April 1 to determine the amount. Board members agreed some extra should be set aside for unforeseen expenses.

Source: Hopkinton Daily News: 2014 Massachusetts Senate race Mar 19, 2014

Bruce Skarin: Decrease income tax; increase gas tax

Combatting global climate change and the national debt are Mr. Skarin's top priorities. As for taxes, he sees the need for higher taxes in some areas, such as the gas tax, but he says those can be balanced by selective cuts in the income tax and loosening of regulations to encourage business growth.
Source: Worcester Telegram on 2014 Massachusetts Senate race Feb 14, 2014

Deval Patrick: Let municipalities raise property, meals, and lodging taxes

While we may not be able to fund local aid at current levels, we can provide tools to help local governments better manage through these difficult times.

In that spirit, we will again propose a series of measures that give cities and towns greater authority over local decisions. That includes raising new revenue through a modest meals and lodging tax, eliminating the outdated exemption the phone company enjoys from paying the same local property taxes everyone else has to pay, and encouraging as much regionalization of local services as practical. If we cannot provide direct aid, let's at least untie the hands of local communities to capture the savings and raise the revenue within their reach. Let's enact a municipal reform package this spring.

Source: 2009 State of the State speech to Massachusetts Legislature Jan 1, 2009

Karyn Polito: Voted NO on postponing reduction of income tax to 5%

Massachusetts Democratic Party Platform indicates voting YES in Part XII: TAXES AND SERVICES: Clause 1: Condemn tax cuts. [State Rep. Polito, a Republican, voted NO].

An amendment was proposed to reduce income tax to 5%. An amendment to the amendment stating that it can't take effect until the department of revenue does a study on numerous related consequences.

The relevant part of the MassDems Platform is Part XII, clause 1: TAXES AND PUBLIC SERVICES: Massachusetts Democrats condemn the tax cuts that leave cities and towns to fend for themselves with only the regressive property tax as the primary source of revenue.

Bill H. 4440 ; vote number H238

Source: Massachusetts House voting record via MassScorecard.org Oct 18, 2005

Marty Walsh: Voted YES on postponing reduction of income tax to 5%

Massachusetts Democratic Party Platform indicates voting YES in Part XII: TAXES AND SERVICES: Clause 1: Condemn tax cuts. [State Rep. Walsh, a Democrat, voted YES].

An amendment was proposed to reduce income tax to 5%. An amendment to the amendment stating that it can't take effect until the department of revenue does a study on numerous related consequences.

The relevant part of the MassDems Platform is Part XII, clause 1: TAXES AND PUBLIC SERVICES: Massachusetts Democrats condemn the tax cuts that leave cities and towns to fend for themselves with only the regressive property tax as the primary source of revenue.

Bill H. 4440 ; vote number H238

Source: Massachusetts House voting record via MassScorecard.org Oct 18, 2005

Karyn Polito: Voted YES on capital gains tax rebates

Massachusetts Democratic Party Platform indicates voting NO in Part IV: ECONOMIC GROWTH: Clause 14, tax breaks to wealthy. [State Rep. Polito, a Republican, voted YES].

This vote was on an amendment to an omnibus tax reform bill. The amendment would reduce revenue available for state programs by $250 million through tax rebates to people affected by the repeal of the capital gains tax break in 2002, a rebate primarily benefiting the wealthiest 1% of people in the state. Voting NO would reject the capital gains tax rebates.

The relevant part of the MassDems Platform is Part iv. ECONOMIC GROWTH, Clause 14: We oppose the Republican administration policy of giving tax breaks to the wealthiest individuals.... These policies unfairly increase the tax burden at the state and local level.

Bill H. 2606, sec. 56-57 ; vote number H075

Source: Massachusetts House voting record via MassScorecard.org Jun 15, 2005

Marty Walsh: Voted NO on capital gains tax rebates

Massachusetts Democratic Party Platform indicates voting NO in Part IV: ECONOMIC GROWTH: Clause 14, tax breaks to wealthy. [State Rep. Walsh, a Democrat, voted NO].

This vote was on an amendment to an omnibus tax reform bill. The amendment would reduce revenue available for state programs by $250 million through tax rebates to people affected by the repeal of the capital gains tax break in 2002, a rebate primarily benefiting the wealthiest 1% of people in the state. Voting NO would reject the capital gains tax rebates.

The relevant part of the MassDems Platform is Part iv. ECONOMIC GROWTH, Clause 14: We oppose the Republican administration policy of giving tax breaks to the wealthiest individuals.... These policies unfairly increase the tax burden at the state and local level.

Bill H. 2606, sec. 56-57 ; vote number H075

Source: Massachusetts House voting record via MassScorecard.org Jun 15, 2005

Richard Tisei: Voted YES on municipal meals tax, in addition to state tax

Massachusetts Democratic Party Platform indicates voting YES in Part II: Education:Full Funding. [State Senator Tisei, a Republican, voted YES].

Any city or town shall be authorized to impose a local excise tax upon the sale of meals, of 1% of the tota price thereof. The local excise tax imposed shall be paid by the vendor in the same manner as the excise tax due the commonwealth. All sums received shall at least quarterly be distributed, credited and paid by the state treasurer to each city or town. [Provides a new revenue source for cities and towns to pay for schools and other local services].

Relevant platform section: PART II: EDUCATION, TRAINING, AND OPPORTUNITY: Full Funding: "We reject policies that direct funds away from our public schools to finance political promises of tax reductions or to other unrelated purposes. We support just and equitable funding mechanisms that provide for vibrant public schools in all communities."

Source citation: Section 100 ; vote number 122

Source: Massachusetts Senate voting record via MassScorecard.org Jun 12, 2003

John Kerry: We’re tired of being trickled on--Middle class tax cuts now

The Republicans promised with their first tax cut a million jobs would be created. A million were lost. Now they come with another tax cut; they accelerate the highest rate cuts for the wealthiest Americans and wait for the trickle down. Well, a lot of hard working Americans who are tired of getting trickled on. We want to create jobs now by giving a middle class tax cut; by restoring confidence in our economy with fiscal responsibility; and putting Americans back to work now.
Source: Keynote Speech to Massachusetts Democratic Issues Convention Jun 7, 2003

Karyn Polito: Voted NO on municipal meals tax, in addition to state tax

Massachusetts Democratic Party Platform indicates voting YES in Part II: Education:Full Funding. [State Rep. Polito, a Republican, voted NO].

Any city or town shall be authorized to impose a local excise tax upon the sale of meals, of 1% of the total price thereof. The local excise tax imposed shall be paid by the vendor in the same manner as the excise tax due the commonwealth. All sums received shall at least quarterly be distributed, credited and paid by the state treasurer to each city or town. [Provides a new revenue source for cities and towns to pay for schools and other local services].

Relevant platform section: PART II: EDUCATION, TRAINING, AND OPPORTUNITY: Full Funding: "We reject policies that direct funds away from our public schools to finance political promises of tax reductions or to other unrelated purposes. We support just and equitable funding mechanisms that provide for vibrant public schools in all communities."

Source citation: Section 100 ; vote number 122

Source: Massachusetts House voting record via MassScorecard.org Jun 4, 2003

Marty Walsh: Voted YES on municipal meals tax, in addition to state tax

Massachusetts Democratic Party Platform indicates voting YES in Part II: Education:Full Funding. [State Rep. Walsh voted YES].

Any city or town shall be authorized to impose a local excise tax upon the sale of meals, of 1% of the total price thereof. The local excise tax imposed shall be paid by the vendor in the same manner as the excise tax due the commonwealth. All sums received shall at least quarterly be distributed, credited and paid by the state treasurer to each city or town. [Provides a new revenue source for cities and towns to pay for schools and other local services].

Relevant platform section: PART II: EDUCATION, TRAINING, AND OPPORTUNITY: Full Funding: "We reject policies that direct funds away from our public schools to finance political promises of tax reductions or to other unrelated purposes. We support just and equitable funding mechanisms that provide for vibrant public schools in all communities."

Source citation: Section 100 ; vote number 122

Source: Massachusetts House voting record via MassScorecard.org Jun 4, 2003

Scott Brown: Voted NO on municipal meals tax, in addition to state tax

Massachusetts Democratic Party Platform indicates voting YES in Part II: Education:Full Funding. [State Senator Brown, a Republican, voted NO].

Any city or town shall be authorized to impose a local excise tax upon the sale of meals, of 1% of the total price thereof. The local excise tax imposed shall be paid by the vendor in the same manner as the excise tax due the commonwealth. All sums received shall at least quarterly be distributed, credited and paid by the state treasurer to each city or town. [Provides a new revenue source for cities and towns to pay for schools and other local services].

Relevant platform section: PART II: EDUCATION, TRAINING, AND OPPORTUNITY: Full Funding: "We reject policies that direct funds away from our public schools to finance political promises of tax reductions or to other unrelated purposes. We support just and equitable funding mechanisms that provide for vibrant public schools in all communities."

Source citation: Section 100 ; vote number 122

Source: Massachusetts House voting record via MassScorecard.org Jun 4, 2003

Karyn Polito: Voted NO on raising income tax to 5.95% to offset deficit

Massachusetts Democratic Party Platform indicates voting YES in Part V: Fiscal Responsibility:Tax Fairness and Responsible Budgeting. [State Rep. Polito, a Republican, voted NO].

Taxable income shall be taxed at the rate of 5.95 per cent for tax years beginning in 2003, for Part B income [restore tax rate].

Relevant platform section: PART V: FISCAL RESPONSIBILITY, TAX EQUITY, & PUBLIC STEWARDSHIP: Tax Fairness and Responsible Budgeting: "We believe that taxes should be fair and based on ability to pay, and that budgets should be fiscally responsible and balanced without gimmicks."

Source citation: Section 470 ; vote number 64

Source: Massachusetts House voting record via MassScorecard.org Apr 30, 2003

Marty Walsh: Voted NO on raising income tax to 5.95% to offset deficit

Massachusetts Democratic Party Platform indicates voting YES in Part V: Fiscal Responsibility:Tax Fairness and Responsible Budgeting. [State Rep. Walsh voted NO].

Taxable income shall be taxed at the rate of 5.95 per cent for tax years beginning in 2003, for Part B income [restore tax rate].

Relevant platform section: PART V: FISCAL RESPONSIBILITY, TAX EQUITY, & PUBLIC STEWARDSHIP: Tax Fairness and Responsible Budgeting: "We believe that taxes should be fair and based on ability to pay, and that budgets should be fiscally responsible and balanced without gimmicks."

Source citation: Section 470 ; vote number 64

Source: Massachusetts House voting record via MassScorecard.org Apr 30, 2003

Scott Brown: Voted NO on raising income tax to 5.95% to offset deficit

Massachusetts Democratic Party Platform indicates voting YES in Part V: Fiscal Responsibility:Tax Fairness and Responsible Budgeting. [State Senator Brown, a Republican, voted NO].

Taxable income shall be taxed at the rate of 5.95 per cent for tax years beginning in 2003, for Part B income [restore tax rate].

Relevant platform section: PART V: FISCAL RESPONSIBILITY, TAX EQUITY, & PUBLIC STEWARDSHIP: Tax Fairness and Responsible Budgeting: "We believe that taxes should be fair and based on ability to pay, and that budgets should be fiscally responsible and balanced without gimmicks."

Source citation: Section 470 ; vote number 64

Source: Massachusetts House voting record via MassScorecard.org Apr 30, 2003

Carla Howell: End the income tax; small govt doesn’t need it

$700 billion out of the $1.9 trillion federal budget comes from our personal income taxes. Ending the personal income tax would cut the total federal budget back to a $1.2 trillion Reagan era budget. I seek to make the federal government so small it doesn’t need an income tax. Ending the personal income tax means that the average American taxpayer will keep $6,000 every year. That means prosperity for our families and our communities. instead of an over-bloated federal government.
Source: Eric Darbe, Massachusetts News Jan 5, 2000

  • The above quotations are from Commonwealth of Massachusetts Politicians: secondary Archives.
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2016 Presidential contenders on Tax Reform:
  Republicans:
Gov.Jeb Bush(FL)
Dr.Ben Carson(MD)
Gov.Chris Christie(NJ)
Sen.Ted Cruz(TX)
Carly Fiorina(CA)
Gov.Jim Gilmore(VA)
Sen.Lindsey Graham(SC)
Gov.Mike Huckabee(AR)
Gov.Bobby Jindal(LA)
Gov.John Kasich(OH)
Gov.Sarah Palin(AK)
Gov.George Pataki(NY)
Sen.Rand Paul(KY)
Gov.Rick Perry(TX)
Sen.Rob Portman(OH)
Sen.Marco Rubio(FL)
Sen.Rick Santorum(PA)
Donald Trump(NY)
Gov.Scott Walker(WI)
Democrats:
Gov.Lincoln Chafee(RI)
Secy.Hillary Clinton(NY)
V.P.Joe Biden(DE)
Gov.Martin O`Malley(MD)
Sen.Bernie Sanders(VT)
Sen.Elizabeth Warren(MA)
Sen.Jim Webb(VA)

2016 Third Party Candidates:
Gov.Gary Johnson(L-NM)
Roseanne Barr(PF-HI)
Robert Steele(L-NY)
Dr.Jill Stein(G,MA)
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