State of Delaware Archives: on Education


Jack Markell: Common Core Standards including world language immersion

We made the difficult choice to raise our academic standards for the world our children will live in. Teachers across the state are transitioning to the Common Core Standards, a set of uniform, higher standards that will better prepare our students for the global economy. As we move to these higher standards, fewer of our students will meet them initially. It is not an easy change, but it is one we must make, and our students will rise to the challenge.

Thanks to another investment, 10,000 Delaware students will participate in a world language immersion program over the next decade. 340 students started the program this year. For example, at McIlvane Early Learning Center in Magnolia, 100 kindergartners spend half their school day learning science, social studies and math in Chinese. One of the Chinese teachers there had a goal for her students to be able to count to 100 by the end of the school year; they accomplished that by November.

Source: 2013 Delaware State of the State speech Jan 17, 2013

Alex Pires: More education in math, science, technology & engineering

To compete globally in the job market, Pires said, the nation's children need more education in the fields of math, science, technology and engineering. "We are falling behind," he said. "We haven't put our efforts in the right place."

Pires said it is important to focus on science and math in early education because when students reach college, it is too late to put them on a different path.

Source: Cape Gazette on 2012 Delaware Senate debate Oct 19, 2012

Kevin Wade: Department of Education has been an abysmal failure

Wade said the federal Department of Education was created 40 years ago to maximize the effectiveness of education. "It's been an abysmal failure," he said.
Source: Cape Gazette on 2012 Delaware Senate debate Oct 19, 2012

Jack Markell: Ensure we have the best possible public schools

[We will work] with Delaware's excellent educators to ensure we have the best possible public schools. Employers want to know that their children will have a great place to learn and that our schools will graduate young people ready to thrive in the work world. Our students today are graduating into a job environment far different from what their parents faced. They are competing with graduates from around the world for jobs and we are competing with governments to help make those opportunities available
Source: 2011 Delaware State of the State Address Jan 20, 2011

Chris Coons: Race to the Top: successful change for DE schools

Q: Do you feel teacher unions are too powerful?

COONS: I've complimented both Delaware's teachers and Delaware's governor for their remarkable progress under the "Race to the Top" program. The Obama/Biden administration set a very high bar. They offered a federal pot of money that was available for those states that were willing to make significant changes and Delaware made that progress. Delaware's teachers union, the DSEA, came to the table and made significant changes: to embrace charter and to make them more powerful, to make it possible for schools that are underperforming to be shut down or restructured and to change a system so that teacher compensation could be tied towards improvement by students in the classroom.

O'DONNELL: If you notice, he didn't answer the question as to whether or not he thought the teacher unions were too powerful, and that's probably because he got their endorsement.

Source: CNN's Wolf Blitzer moderating 2010 Delaware Senate debate Oct 13, 2010

Chris Coons: I Have a Dream Foundation: private money for public college

Q: In a recent survey of 30 industrialized countries, the US ranked 25th in math; Finland was first. The US was 21st in science; South Korea was first. Specifically what would you do to make the US number one, once again, in math and science?

COONS:As someone who spent 20 years working with a non-profit foundation, the I Have a Dream Foundation, that raises money from private individuals and helps provide scholarships for students, for teachers, and for a college education, I've been hands-on and engaged with some of the toughest schools in America and some teachers who are significantly under-supported and who needed additional resources. I think there's a significant role, though, for the federal government in providing financial support and encouragement, scholarships for those teachers in science and math. We need a new generation of teachers who are fully prepared to teach to the standards that No Child Left Behind established. And we frankly need to use collaborative learning techniques.

Source: CNN's Wolf Blitzer moderating 2010 Delaware Senate debate Oct 13, 2010

Christine O`Donnell: My evolution belief is irrelevant; let local schools decide

Q: In a television appearance back in 1998 on Bill Maher's show you said evolution is a myth. Do you believe evolution is a myth?

O'DONNELL: I was talking about what a local school taught and that should be decided on the local community.

Q: Do you believe evolution is a myth?

O'DONNELL: Local schools should make that decision.

Q: What do you believe?

O'DONNELL: What I believe is irrelevant.

Q: Why is it irrelevant?

O'DONNELL: What I will support in Washington, D.C. is the ability for the local school system to decide what is taught in their classrooms and what I was talking about on that show was a classroom that was not allowed to teach creationism as an equal theory as evolution. That is against their constitutional rights and that is an overreaching arm of the government.

Source: CNN's Wolf Blitzer moderating 2010 Delaware Senate debate Oct 13, 2010

Christine O`Donnell: Fix schools by talking to teachers, not unions nor DOE

Q: Do you feel teacher unions are too powerful?

O'DONNELL: Here in Delaware, where we spend so much money on education, it ends up going to the six-figure salaries of our bureaucrats & superintendents, not to the teachers in the classroom. It's appalling that in a state where we spend so much federal and state dollars on education, good teachers who want to get extra materials have to do so out of their pocket. We have a broken system especially in Wilmington where I live. Throwing more money o a broken system is not going to work. Instead, what we need to do is sit down and have conversations with the teachers--not the unions--about what they need us to do to help them in their classroom.

Q: Do you support eliminating the Dept. of Education?

O'DONNELL: I don't think that we need to go to that drastic of a step, but millions of dollars in Dept. of Education money has been abused. Every time that there's a problem, we just throw more money in it to appease the special interest groups.

Source: CNN's Wolf Blitzer moderating 2010 Delaware Senate debate Oct 13, 2010

Tom Carper: Introduce market forces into our schools

In the US Senate, I have worked tirelessly to preserve Dover Air Force Base; to save the Delaware National Guard, to replenish our DE beaches. In the US Senate what Iíve done is to build bipartisan coalitions, not only to address global warming, but to clean up our air. Iíve built bipartisan coalitions to better educate our children and introduce market forces into our schools.
Source: Delaware 2006 Senate Debate, hosted by WHYY-TV Oct 20, 2006

Ruth Ann Minner: Put reading specialists in every elementary school

I believe, as do many experts, that reading is the most crucial aspect of education. Without a proper foundation in reading, it is not possible for a student to master math, or history, or literature or science. [So I] promise to put a reading specialist in every elementary school, a reading specialist who can spend extra time with students in early grades and help smooth the path for them for years to come.
Source: 2001 State of the State Address to Delaware Assembly Jan 25, 2001

Tom Carper: Focus on discipline in schools

School reforms wonít be effective in classrooms that are too disruptive for teachers to teach and students to learn. To help create disciplined classroom environments, weíve initiated disruption prevention programs in every Delaware public school. Weíve created alternative learning centers for chronically disruptive students in each of our counties. It hasnít been enough. This year, I will propose to increase by 50% what we currently spend on discipline, to expand the program statewide.
Source: 1999 Delaware State of the State Speech Jan 21, 1999

  • The above quotations are from State of Delaware Politicians: Archives.
  • Click here for definitions & background information on Education.
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2012 Presidential contenders on Education:
  Democrats:
Pres.Barack Obama(IL)
V.P.Joe Biden(DE)

Republicans:
Gov.Mitt Romney(MA)
Rep.Paul Ryan(WI)
Third Parties:
Green: Dr.Jill Stein(MA)
Libertarian: Gov.Gary Johnson(NM)
Justice: Mayor Rocky Anderson(UT)
Constitution: Rep.Virgil Goode(VA)
Peace+Freedom: Roseanne Barr(HI)
Reform Party: André Barnett(NY)
AmericansElect: Gov.Buddy Roemer(LA)
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Page last updated: Dec 16, 2013