State of Iowa Archives: on Energy & Oil


Sam Clovis: Exploit every form of energy, underground and above ground

There is no reason the United States should not be energy independent in 10 years. The effects on our economy of gaining energy independence would be immediate and long-lasting. The trade balance would move from the negative side of the ledger to the positive side. Our current reliance on oil from countries that are hostile to the US would be eliminated. World geopolitics would be significantly more stable and Americans would have to worry a great deal less about having to police the world.

Energy independence includes expanding and exploiting every form of energy from that found underground to all available sources found above ground, as well. Wind, solar, nuclear and bio-fuels should be further cultivated to balance energy sources and to reduce our reliance on fossil fuels.

Source: 2014 Senate campaign website, Iowans4SamClovis.com, "Issues" Nov 11, 2013

Matthew Whitaker: Cap-and-trade proposal stifles the American dream

A common theme of the night [among Republican candidates] was the belief that the generations of today and tomorrow won't have the opportunities that have been afforded them. "The American Dream is under dramatic challenges today," said Matt Whitaker.

Source: Waterloo-Cedar Falls Courier on 2014 Iowa Senate race Sep 23, 2013

Michele Bachmann: I opposed cap-and-trade, including Lightbulb Choice Act

Q: There's an expression "Minnesota Nice." And some people believe that both of you have tested it in recent weeks. Gov. Pawlenty said you have no accomplishments in Congress?

BACHMANN: When you were governor in Minnesota you implemented cap and trade in our state and you praised the unconstitutional individual mandates and called for requiring all people in our state to purchase health insurance. You said the era of small government was over. That sounds more like Barack Obama, if you ask me. During my time in the US Congress I have fought all of these unconstitutional measures as well as Barack Obama.

Q: Isn't that about the worst thing you can say about a fellow Republican, that he reminds you of Barack Obama?

BACHMANN: The policies that the governor advocated for were cap and trade. When it came to cap and trade, I fought it with everything that was in me, including introducing the Lightbulb Freedom of Choice Act so people could all purchase the lightbulb of their choice.

Source: Iowa Straw Poll 2011 GOP debate in Ames Iowa Aug 11, 2011

Terry Branstad: Supports wind energy by signing HF 672

[On signing HF 672]: It is the intent of the general assembly to encourage the development of renewable electric power generation. It is also the intent of the general assembly to encourage the use of renewable power to meet local electric needs and the development of transmission capacity to export wind power generated in Iowa.
Source: 2011 Iowa Gubernatorial press release May 26, 2011

Chuck Grassley: Biodiesel is not controversial, unlike ethanol

Both candidates stressed the importance of renewable energy in Iowa and focused on biodiesel and the soon-to-expire tax credit.

"There's not controversy about biodiesel," Grassley said, saying that nearly everyone sees its value, unlike ethanol.

Conlin mentioned that Grassley voted against bills that would have provided for an extended tax credit. The credit was attached to a bill for unemployment workers. "So concerned was Sen. Grassley about not helping those out of work that he voted against the biodiesel tax credit," she said.

Grassley said a number of provisions regarding the tax issues [extending the biodiesel credit] would pass easily, perhaps even unanimously, if they were standalone bills. However, attaching them to other bills makes them bad pieces of legislation.

Source: Times-Republican coverage of 2010 Iowa Senate debate Aug 29, 2010

Roxanne Conlin: Grassley voted against extending biodiesel tax credit

Both candidates stressed the importance of renewable energy in Iowa and focused on biodiesel and the soon-to-expire tax credit.

"There's not controversy about biodiesel," Grassley said, saying that nearly everyone sees its value, unlike ethanol.

Conlin mentioned that Grassley voted against bills that would have provided for an extended tax credit. The credit was attached to a bill for unemployment workers. "So concerned was Sen. Grassley about not helping those out of work that he voted against the biodiesel tax credit," she said.

Grassley said a number of provisions regarding the tax issues [extending the biodiesel credit] would pass easily, perhaps even unanimously, if they were standalone bills. However, attaching them to other bills makes them bad pieces of legislation.

Source: Times-Republican coverage of 2010 Iowa Senate debate Aug 29, 2010

Roxanne Conlin: Invest in homegrown alternatives to foreign oil

In the Senate, I will put Iowans to work by investing in homegrown alternatives that lessen our dependence on foreign oil and clean up our environment. [We should] preserve the jobs we have, while also creating new ones with a renewable energy revolution--in wind, solar, ethanol, and biomass.
Source: 2010 Senate campaign website, www.RoxanneForIowa, "Issues" Jul 20, 2010

Roxanne Conlin: Focus on the sun, the wind, and biomass

The US must invest in clean, home-grown, renewable and sustainable energy to remain the leading superpower in the 21st Century. The resources we can use: the sun, the wind, corn, and biomass are readily available and do not require unfair trade agreements and do not further harm the environment. But to make use of our clean energy resources, we must accelerate the building of the smart grid across the nation's heartland to accelerate distribution of this new energy from where it is produced to where it is needed.
    Moving toward energy independence serves three important goals:
  1. It creates new and permanent American jobs.
  2. It protects our environment.
  3. It enhances our national security by decreasing the amount of money that we send to nations that train and harbor terrorists.
I see this issue as a moral imperative. For too long, elected officials have been focused on the next election and not the next generation. I will focus on the next generation exclusively.
Source: 2010 Senate campaign website, www.RoxanneForIowa, "Issues" Jul 20, 2010

Christopher Reed: Drill for more American oil to reduce gas prices

Reed advocated for drilling for more American oil to bring down the price of gasoline and create jobs. “My opponent has no desire to drill for oil--none. His plan is simply to tax production and expand government,” Reed said. “That will never put one dro of fuel in your tank. My plan is to drill here, drill now and drill often.”

Reed said domestic oil sources would help in the meantime while alternative energy sources such as wind and solar power are developed into a more viable means of energy. Reed also urged energy conservation, but said that should come from individual responsibility, not from a government mandate.

In contrast, Harkin argued drilling on the intercontinental shelf is expensive and would do little to immediately bring down oil prices. Instead, he argued for developing technologies such as an electric-powered car and cellulosic ethanol in addition to developing wind and solar energy. “We need an energy program that doesn’t just chase the last barrel of oil,” Harkin said.

Source: 2008 Iowa Senate debate reported in Des Moines Globe Gazette Aug 13, 2008

Tom Harkin: Develop cellulosic ethanol, wind, and solar

Reed advocated for drilling for more American oil to bring down the price of gasoline and create jobs. “My opponent has no desire to drill for oil--none. His plan is simply to tax production and expand government,” Reed said. “That will never put one dro of fuel in your tank. My plan is to drill here, drill now and drill often.”

Reed said domestic oil sources would help in the meantime while alternative energy sources such as wind and solar power are developed into a more viable means of energy. Reed also urged energy conservation, but said that should come from individual responsibility, not from a government mandate.

In contrast, Harkin argued drilling on the intercontinental shelf is expensive and would do little to immediately bring down oil prices. Instead, he argued for developing technologies such as an electric-powered car and cellulosic ethanol in addition to developing wind and solar energy. “We need an energy program that doesn’t just chase the last barrel of oil,” Harkin said.

Source: 2008 Iowa Senate debate reported in Des Moines Globe Gazette Aug 13, 2008

Christopher Reed: Not ready to jump head first into biofuels

Q: What is your view on the usage of biofuels such as biodiesel and ethanol?

A: Obviously, Iowa would be at the forefront of bio-fuel technology. However, it needs to be reasonably priced, clean and efficient. I believe that Iowa would reap the benefits of bio-fuels as the Middle East has from oil. I want this success for all Iowans and other American farmers. But I am not quite ready to jump head first into it without first making sure it is the best suit for America.

Source: The Iowa Brigade, email questionnaire Apr 2, 2008

Christopher Reed: Coal & nuclear have gotten a bad rap

Coal has gotten a bad rap from the EPA. It is billed as an evil, dirty fuel. Now, that being said, I know coal is a major player in providing energy for many Americans. It is no secret that we need more sources of energy and more power plants to provide it to the people who need it.

I would still say that I believe nuclear energy is the cleanest, cheapest form of energy. Nuclear power gets a bad rap from the press behind EPA and radicals on the left. I think we need more nuclear plants.

Source: The Iowa Brigade, email questionnaire Apr 2, 2008

Mitt Romney: No-regrets policy: energy independence and CO2 reduction

I adopt what I call "no regrets policies": Policies that will allow us to become energy independent and will have as one of their by-products, reduction of the CO2 that we emit, the greenhouse gases that we emit. So let me tell you the kinds of things that I'd like to do.

With regards to our developing more energy, I want to see us use more of our renewable resources: bio-diesel, bio-fuel, ethanol, cellulosic ethanol. I want to see us developing liquefied coal if we can sequester the CO2 properly. I want to see nuclear power. I want to see us develop our own oil off-shore, and in ANWR.

On the other side of the equation, in addition to developing our energy, we have to be more efficient in our use of it. And that means more fuel efficient vehicles. It means more energy efficient homes. The combination of more efficiency and the generation of more domestic-sourced energy will allow us to become energy independent. And that has as the benefit, of reducing our emissions of CO2.

Source: Town Hall Meeting in West Des Moines Iowa May 31, 2007

Alan Keyes: Explore & exploit ANWR, while respecting ecology

FORBES [to Keyes]: Would you support opening up ANWR in Alaska for exploration to find out what oil we have there and to get that oil out so we’re a little less dependent on sources, unstable sources overseas?

KEYES: Yes, I would. We’re going to have to try to take advantage of our energy reserves. We want to do it in a way that’s responsible-respecting ecological requirements and at the same time exploiting God’s precious resources for the good of our people. It’s also important because if we can reduce our dependence on foreign oil, it buys us time in order to make use of our ingenuity to develop alternative energy resources. So I would support that and I think that it’s a good way to go, provided we do it in a way that is responsible and that harnesses our scientific know-how to make sure we respect environmental requirements.

FORBES: The environmental technology is there to do the job right and you’re right, we should do it right now.

Source: (x-ref from Forbes) GOP Debate in Johnston, Iowa Jan 16, 2000

Gary Bauer: Resources are there to be used

Q: Do you think tougher laws are needed to protect our environment? A: None of us want polluted water or polluted air. We also don’t want out-of-control federal regulators that don’t care about people’s jobs; who see the American people as the enemy; who want to keep us out of the national parks; who want to keep us out of recreation areas. The resources are there to be used. But they need to be used in a way so that my children & grandchildren will also be able to enjoy them in the future.
Source: GOP Debate in Johnston, Iowa Jan 16, 2000

Orrin Hatch: Eliminate Kyoto Accords and implement more local control

Q: Do you think tougher laws are needed to protect our environment? A: We’re spending billions on lawyers with false science and a lot of other things that just aren’t working. First day in office, I will get rid of the Kyoto Accords that could add $3,000 to everybody’s fuel bill in America. I’m not going to [issue] executive orders that set aside huge, huge, vast lands without consulting with Congress and without consulting with the people in those particular states.
Source: GOP Debate in Johnston, Iowa Jan 16, 2000

Steve Forbes: Explore ANWR immediately, to reduce foreign oil dependence

FORBES [to Keyes]: Would you support opening up ANWR in Alaska for exploration to find out what oil we have there and to get that oil out so we’re a little less dependent on sources, unstable sources overseas?

KEYES: Yes, I would. We’re going to have to try to take advantage of our energy reserves. We want to do it in a way that’s responsible-respecting ecological requirements and at the same time exploiting God’s precious resources for the good of our people. It’s also important because if we can reduce our dependence on foreign oil, it buys us time in order to make use of our ingenuity to develop alternative energy resources. So I would support that and I think that it’s a good way to go, provided we do it in a way that is responsible and that harnesses our scientific know-how to make sure we respect environmental requirements.

FORBES: The environmental technology is there to do the job right and you’re right, we should do it right now.

Source: (x-ref to Keyes) GOP Debate in Johnston, Iowa Jan 16, 2000

Orrin Hatch: Revoke Kyoto Accords as environmental extremism

I don’t agree with environmental extremism that would make us uncompetitive with the rest of the world. One of the first things I would do, is revoke the Kyoto Accords. They place environmental extreme requirements on the US but nobody else. There’s no real reason, scientific or otherwise, why that should occur. It would cost [the average person] $1,500 to $3,000 more for fuel costs alone every year. It’s environmental extremism at its worst.
Source: Des Moines Iowa GOP Debate Dec 13, 1999

  • The above quotations are from State of Iowa Politicians: Archives.
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2012 Presidential contenders on Energy & Oil:
  Democrats:
Pres.Barack Obama(IL)
V.P.Joe Biden(DE)

Republicans:
Gov.Mitt Romney(MA)
Rep.Paul Ryan(WI)
Third Parties:
Green: Dr.Jill Stein(MA)
Libertarian: Gov.Gary Johnson(NM)
Justice: Mayor Rocky Anderson(UT)
Constitution: Rep.Virgil Goode(VA)
Peace+Freedom: Roseanne Barr(HI)
Reform Party: André Barnett(NY)
AmericansElect: Gov.Buddy Roemer(LA)
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Page last updated: Dec 16, 2013