State of Kansas Archives: on Education


Mike Beebe: Teach science and math using new, national methods

We have a new statewide initiative called STEM Works that will change the way we teach science, technology, engineering and math in Arkansas's schools. The goal is make Arkansas more competitive for high-wage jobs in a global economy. Many children are familiar with computers before they even begin school, but we teach using the same methods we have used for centuries. STEM Works will use new methods already producing results in classrooms across the country and around the world.
Source: Arkansas 2011 gubernatorial press release #3038 Aug 18, 2011

Joe Bellis: No vouchers; no charters; no federal involvement

Q: Do you support federal education standards and testing requirements for K-12 students?

A: No.

Q: Do you support federal funding for universal pre-K programs?

A: No.

Q: Do you support federal funding for charter schools?

A: No.

Q: Do you support federal funding for K-12 school vouchers?

A: No.

Q: Other principles?

A: Education is outside of the purview of the federal mandate as delineated in the US Constitution.

Source: Kansas Congressional Election 2010 Political Courage Test Sep 25, 2010

Lisa Johnston: K-12 education must be a top priority

Unfortunately, no child left behind left many children behind. Even though education is a substantial investment, it must be a priority at both the state and federal level.
Source: 2010 Senate campaign website, lisaforkansas.com, "Issues" Aug 12, 2010

Mark Parkinson: World-class public school system is investment in future

Our founders shared a vision of great public schools and outstanding universities. In the early years, our leaders understood the importance of a great higher education system. They established Kansas State University in 1863, just two years after Kansas became a state. Since then we have formed six other major universities, 19 community colleges and seven technical schools and colleges.

The same can be said of our investment in our public schools. While other states were shy to adopt public education, we embraced it. Our leaders made the conscious decision clear back in the 1860s to spend money on public education. This commitment to public schools was not one time or intermittent; it was long-lasting. It is at the very essence of what makes Kansas, Kansas.

Throughout our history this has worked. We developed a world class public school system. It happened because those that came before us had vision and the courage to make investments in our future.

Source: Kansas 2010 State of the State Address Jan 11, 2010

John Kerry: Chides Bush for not fully funding No Child Left Behind

Kerry criticized the president for failing to push for full funding to carry out the 2002 No Child Left Behind law. “You cannot promise no child left behind and then pursue policies that leave millions of children behind every single day,” Kerry said, calling the new law “a promissory note to all of America’s families that must be paid in full.
Source: William Douglas/Tom Fitzgerald; Kansas City Star May 17, 2004

Kathleen Sebelius: Education First: Target additional $300M where most needed

My Education First plan will provide an additional $300 million to Kansas schools over the next three years. It’s a responsible plan that targets additional resources to where they are most needed: teachers; early-education programs, including all-day kindergarten; and at-risk students who need our help to succeed. It invests $10 million in Smart Start programs across the state. Early learning programs are among the best investments we can make in the future.
Source: 2004 State of the State address to the Kansas Legislature Jan 12, 2004

Kathleen Sebelius: Minimize the need for college tuition increases

It’s critical that we do more to sustain our institutions of higher learning. Because of our difficult financial times, we have failed to keep a promise made to the state’s colleges and universities to provide funding to retain key faculty and minimize the need for tuition increases. My proposal fulfills that promise.
Source: 2004 State of the State address to the Kansas Legislature Jan 12, 2004

Kathleen Sebelius: Review district finances and bring efficiency

I propose we create a school audit team in the Division of the Budget to review district finances and help schools become more efficient. I expect these reviews, which have been successfully launched in Texas, Virginia, and a handful of other states, will provide that confidence to taxpayers and parents. I believe they’ll help Kansas school districts streamline their management and business practices so that more dollars reach the classroom and fewer are spent on unnecessary layers of bureaucracy.
Source: 2004 State of the State address to the Kansas Legislature Jan 12, 2004

Kathleen Sebelius: Pay teachers adequately and provide them with health care

In exchange for additional resources, we must also demand that school districts be good employers. We must demand that they adequately pay teachers and provide them with the health coverage that other public employees enjoy. We know that health insurance is a powerful recruitment and retention tool. Providing it to teachers will keep talent in Kansas classrooms.
Source: 2004 State of the State address to the Kansas Legislature Jan 12, 2004

Wesley Clark: Decries lack of funding for No Child Left Behind

[Clark] decried the lack of funding for the No Child Left Behind Act, saying ‘we should stop beating teachers over the head and start supporting them.’
Source: Matt Stearns, The Kansas City Star, Apr 28, 2003

Kathleen Sebelius: Increase state funding instead of local property taxes

Sebelius called for increases in the base per-pupil state funding. “Legislative increases have not kept pace with inflation,” she said, “which forces the school districts to fall back on local property taxes to finance their budget.” The problem is those property taxes vary statewide & some school districts are receiving much more funding than others. “Quality education should not be an accident of geography,” she said. “It should be funded at the state level.”
Source: Kansas State eCollegian, “Sebelius Discusses Issues” Oct 7, 2002

Mike Huckabee: First priority: Raise teacher salaries

Our basic constitutional responsibility is to provide for free, equitable and adequate public education for students through the 12th grade. I would recommend that we set for ourselves the task of raising teacher salaries in this state by $3,000, recognizing that’s not enough and it’s not the finish line but it’s a good starting point. If we don’t raise those salaries at least by that kind of money, we are going to be further and further behind.
Source: 2001 State of the State address to the Arkansas legislature Jan 9, 2001

Bill Graves: More funding for special education and parental services

Over the last six years, we have tripled funding for a program that teaches parents how to be better teachers to their children. In special education, six years ago, 67,000 students were served by 8,200 teachers at a cost of $205 million. Now, 10,000 more students are served by 2,700 additional teachers at a cost of $312 million. That’s a 15 percent increase in special education students served by a 33 percent increase in teachers at a cost of 52 percent more.
Source: State of the state address to Kansas legislature Jan 8, 2001

Howard Phillips: Education debate today is about sex & crime

Today, the education debate is even further removed from the controversies of the sixties, seventies and eighties, when issues such as forced busing, quotas, and prayer in the schools were hotly argued. Today the focus is on rape and murder in the schools, America 2000, Outcome-Based-Education, and the distribution of condoms, even to students in the fifth grade.
Source: Kansas Education Watch Network Conference, Wichita, Kansas Aug 7, 1993

Howard Phillips: Schools sponsor the official state religion of humanism

Anti-Christian humanists who advocate separating church from state are total hypocrites unless they similarly insist upon the separation of education from state, because every government-subsidized school has become an establishment of the officially approved state religion, censoring prayer, subsidizing sex, denying creation, rewriting history, undermining parental authority, denigrating Biblical values, and dumbing down the children so that they may be no wiser than those who run our government.
Source: Kansas Education Watch Network Conference, Wichita, Kansas Aug 7, 1993

Howard Phillips: Separate education from state, or it’s establishing religion

[Those who] advocate. separating church from state are hypocrites unless they similarly insist upon the separation of education from state, because every government-subsidized and regulated school has become an establishment of the officially approved state religion, censoring prayer, subsidizing sex, denying creation, rewriting history, undermining parental authority, denigrating Biblical values, and dumbing down the children so that they may be no wiser than those who run our government.
Source: Remarks at the Kansas Education Watch Network Conference Aug 7, 1993

  • The above quotations are from State of Kansas Politicians: Archives.
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2012 Presidential contenders on Education:
  Democrats:
Pres.Barack Obama(IL)
V.P.Joe Biden(DE)

Republicans:
Gov.Mitt Romney(MA)
Rep.Paul Ryan(WI)
Third Parties:
Green: Dr.Jill Stein(MA)
Libertarian: Gov.Gary Johnson(NM)
Justice: Mayor Rocky Anderson(UT)
Constitution: Rep.Virgil Goode(VA)
Peace+Freedom: Roseanne Barr(HI)
Reform Party: André Barnett(NY)
AmericansElect: Gov.Buddy Roemer(LA)
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Page last updated: Dec 16, 2013