State of Oregon Archives: on Tax Reform


Bud Pierce: Tax relief on mid-tier income earners, to create more jobs

Pierce's campaign focuses on bringing economic prosperity to the state. His main idea is that most of the problems Oregon faces can be fixed by creating more jobs. Establishing a well-trained, well-prepared work force alongside a booming private sector is the key. "The more people we can employ with real jobs, the better our society will be," he said.

Some of the ways he wants to achieve this is through tax relief on mid-tier income and by providing more affordable post-secondary education for students. He also supports programs that support career technical education, such as Measure 98, which would require state funding for dropout-prevention and career and college readiness.

Beyond growing the private sector, Pierce also highlighted his belief that private industry could help run state agencies more efficiently. "The government has to live within the realm of what it has," Pierce said. "It can't keep going to the citizens asking for more money, it needs to learn how to manage money."

Source: Portland Tribune on 2016 Oregon Gubernatorial race

Mark Callahan: Support flat tax or FairTax; oppose growing government

Q: What do you think an improved tax system should look like?

CALLAHAN: I support scaling back and potentially eliminating the IRS, in favor of implementing a more simplified tax system such as a Flat Tax or a Fair Tax.

Q: How will you try to reduce polarization in Congress so problems can be solved?

CALLAHAN: Concentrate on items that we have in common, as Americans, as One Team, as opposed to the issues that divide us. These items can then be solved in a Limited Government manner, by not growing the size of government to solve the problems. Growing the size of government to solve problems is not something we should be doing, as it results in more debt, and less freedom.

Source: League of Women Voters Guide to 2016 Oregon Senate race Sep 9, 2016

Ron Wyden: Sophisticated wealthy few distort tax system

Q: What do you think an improved tax system should look like?

WYDEN: The U.S. tax code is mind-numbingly complex, increasingly unfair, and terribly inefficient. As a result, one of the most consequential pieces of our economic policies stifles rather than encourages economic growth. In effect, America has two different tax systems. The one working families use is mandatory and paid straight out of the paycheck. Then there's another system for the sophisticated, wealthy few, and it distorts the system by saying "pay what you want, when you want." We must simplify the tax code, closing loopholes, lowering compliance burdens, and delivering a tax system that works for all Americans, not just those who can afford costly tax lawyers. The tax code has not been significantly reformed for almost 30 years, and it is long past due for a complete overhaul.

Source: League of Women Voters Guide to 2016 Oregon Senate race Sep 9, 2016

Mark Callahan: Implement a Flat Tax to replace 74,000-page tax system

I will support legislation for the implementation of a Flat Tax, to replace the current tax system. The current tax system is 74,000+ pages long, and full of carve outs and cronyism that disadvantage those in the lower and middle class. I am in favor of greatly reducing the size and scope of the Internal Revenue Service, to bring our country back in line with the precepts of limited government. I believe that we should be able to do our taxes on a post card.
Source: 2016 Oregon Senate campaign website CallahanForOregon.com Aug 31, 2016

Kate Brown: Need more taxes from business to support basic needs

Brown said, "I think it's really important that we have additional revenue to meet Oregon's basic needs," during a legislative session preview. Brown has proposed trying to appease businesses and labor groups that are pushing for either a $15- or $13.50-an-hour minimum wage. Her proposal would raise the minimum wage to $15.52 in the Portland metro area and $13.50 everywhere else by 2022. Still, she said there's no path forward on avoiding the business tax measure.
Source: Bend Bulletin on 2016 Oregon gubernatorial race Jan 27, 2016

Monica Wehby: 40% of budget on debt servicing is generational theft

Our nation spends forty cents on the dollar just to pay for our debt servicing. If we don't do something to end this fiscal insanity our entire country will end up like Greece or Detroit. This is generational theft. As Oregon's U.S. Senator, Monica would enact a Balanced Budget Amendment so that we don't leave our kids with our legacy of debt. It's a moral imperative that we as Americans strive to ensure that the next generation has access to the same opportunities we had growing up.
Source: 2014 Ore. Senate campaign website, www.MonicaForOregon.com Mar 18, 2014

Jason Conger: Pushed tax relief for middle and low income families

Jason, 45, was first elected to the Oregon House of Representatives in 2010 and is now serving his second term. While in the Legislature, Jason used the same drive that carried him out of poverty to pursue his vision for a stronger Oregon. He pushed tax relief for middle and low income families, championed greater educational opportunities for Oregon children, and helped acquire the necessary funding to move OSU-Cascades toward becoming a four-year university.
Source: 2014 Senate campaign website, CongerForOregon.com, "About" Nov 11, 2013

Gordon Harold Smith: I believe in pro-growth tax cuts

Asked about the Bush tax cuts, in particular how Smith could defend them in light of the current economic crisis, Smith said, “I believe in pro-growth tax cuts.” He said that Oregonians today were paying lower federal taxes because of him, but higher state taxes because of Merkley’s work in the state Legislature.

Merkley addressed Smith directly: “The fact is, Gordon, you’ve voted for taxes 67 times.” Merkley said he would support Obama’s proposed plan to raise taxes on people making more than $250,000 per year.

Taxes came up again when both candidates were asked whether it was smart to cut taxes during a time when the national debt is growing. Merkley hung the blame on Smith’s shoulders. “Do you understand that our children are going to have to pay back the debt you are running up?” he asked.

“So what would you have me do?” Smith asked. Much of the money he’s asked for, Smith said, has been because state senators, representatives and others back home have asked him for it.

Source: 2008 Oregon Senate Debate reported by AP on KATU Oct 9, 2008

Jeff Merkley: Supports raising taxes on earnings over $250,000 per year

Asked about the Bush tax cuts, in particular how Smith could defend them in light of the current economic crisis, Smith said, “I believe in pro-growth tax cuts.” He said that Oregonians today were paying lower federal taxes because of him, but higher state taxes because of Merkley’s work in the state Legislature.

Merkley addressed Smith directly: “The fact is, Gordon, you’ve voted for taxes 67 times.” Merkley said he would support Obama’s proposed plan to raise taxes on people making more than $250,000 per year.

Taxes came up again when both candidates were asked whether it was smart to cut taxes during a time when the national debt is growing. Merkley hung the blame on Smith’s shoulders. “Do you understand that our children are going to have to pay back the debt you are running up?” he asked.

“So what would you have me do?” Smith asked. Much of the money he’s asked for, Smith said, has been because state senators, representatives and others back home have asked him for it.

Source: 2008 Oregon Senate Debate reported by AP on KATU Oct 9, 2008

Bruce Broussard: Provide businesses with tax incentives to create jobs

This country runs best on the strength and vitality of businesses, not on the backs of individual tax payers and tax-based programs of government. We must provide businesses with incentives to create jobs. We must also give individuals back the power to support their communities by spending more of their money locally. Broussard supports continued tax cuts to individuals and tax incentives that retain and expand their job base by providing work to Americans not to overseas workers.
Source: 2004 Senate campaign website, BroussardForOregon.com Mar 2, 2004

Winona LaDuke: Favors economic and tax policies to benefit poor, not rich

“I see people who don’t benefit from the economic boom. The trickle-down economy never trickled down,” she said. “That inspires my yearning to see some kind of justice. When are we going to have policies that tax the rich instead of the poor?”
Source: The Oregonian, “Activist Fire” Jul 12, 2000

Jeff Merkley: No state sales tax

Q: Do you support implementing a state sales tax?

A: No. I support equalization between individual and corporate kicker.

Source: Oregon State 1998 National Political Awareness Test Nov 1, 1998

John Kitzhaber: No state sales tax; no flat tax; increase gas tax

Source: Oregon Gubernatorial 1998 National Political Awareness Test Nov 1, 1998

  • The above quotations are from State of Oregon Politicians: Archives.
  • Click here for definitions & background information on Tax Reform.
  • Click here for other issues (main summary page).
2016 Presidential contenders on Tax Reform:
  Republicans:
Gov.Jeb Bush(FL)
Dr.Ben Carson(MD)
Gov.Chris Christie(NJ)
Sen.Ted Cruz(TX)
Carly Fiorina(CA)
Gov.Jim Gilmore(VA)
Sen.Lindsey Graham(SC)
Gov.Mike Huckabee(AR)
Gov.Bobby Jindal(LA)
Gov.John Kasich(OH)
Gov.Sarah Palin(AK)
Gov.George Pataki(NY)
Sen.Rand Paul(KY)
Gov.Rick Perry(TX)
Sen.Rob Portman(OH)
Sen.Marco Rubio(FL)
Sen.Rick Santorum(PA)
Donald Trump(NY)
Gov.Scott Walker(WI)
Democrats:
Gov.Lincoln Chafee(RI)
Secy.Hillary Clinton(NY)
V.P.Joe Biden(DE)
Gov.Martin O`Malley(MD)
Sen.Bernie Sanders(VT)
Sen.Elizabeth Warren(MA)
Sen.Jim Webb(VA)

2016 Third Party Candidates:
Gov.Gary Johnson(L-NM)
Roseanne Barr(PF-HI)
Robert Steele(L-NY)
Dr.Jill Stein(G,MA)
Please consider a donation to OnTheIssues.org!
Click for details -- or send donations to:
1770 Mass Ave. #630, Cambridge MA 02140
E-mail: [email protected]
(We rely on your support!)

Page last updated: Feb 13, 2018