State of Utah Archives: on Education


Gary Herbert: Increase funding for applied technology colleges

Last year, we united behind a commitment to education. We provided for 12,500 new students, we increased per pupil spending, we covered the increased cost of healthcare for our teachers, we invested millions in enhanced individualized instruction and help for at-risk children, and we put millions more in higher education, including our applied technology colleges.

Education is the largest and most important investment Utah makes. While we recognize that money isn't everything, we should still take note--that while so many states face shrinking budgets and bleak forecasts, Utah has the means, the vision, and the commitment to rank education as its top priority. The proof of that investment is unmistakable. The national average Advanced Placement test score is 2.84. Utah's is 3.1. More than 27,000 students prepare for college through concurrent enrollment, and compared to other states with a high percentage of students taking the ACT, Utah ranks second in our test scores.

Source: 2013 State of the State Address to Utah Legislature Jan 30, 2013

Gary Herbert: Fervently committed $40M to STEM education

We must remain fervently committed to STEM--science, technology, engineering and math education. As we discuss the future of STEM, the watchword is alignment--workforce alignment. Nothing matters more than preparing our children to face the new, interdependent global economy. So this year I propose we invest $20 million for STEM education. Eight state institutions of higher learning are reprioritizing their budgets to match that funding dollar for dollar. That's a full $40 million for STEM programs to make Utah's future workforce the smartest, most skilled, and most innovative workforce this nation has ever seen.
Source: 2013 State of the State Address to Utah Legislature Jan 30, 2013

Dan Liljenquist: Let parents pick home, private, charter, or public

There is no role for the federal government in education. When the federal Department of Education was created in 1979, it took education out of the hands of families and the states and moved it to Washington, attempting to create a one-size-fits-all program.

Parents should have the right to decide which educational option is best for them. Parents should have the ability to select how and where their child is educated, whether that be home, private, neighborhood charter schools or public schools.

Source: 2012 Senate campaign website, danforutah.com May 24, 2012

Gary Herbert: Continue to increase funding for public schools

Utah has long been committed to funding our public schools, our colleges and universities, and our technical institutions. In fact, few states in the country spend as much of their overall budgets on education as we do. Our unique demographics--which is a way of saying we have larger families--mean we must continue to increase funding to maintain and enhance the solid education and training our students receive. I cannot say enough about the importance of supporting public education.
Source: Utah 2010 State of the State Address Jan 26, 2010

Jon Huntsman: UCAT system: technical college for industry needs

Workforce demands in quantitative skills continue to increase; yet, our workforce preparation is inadequate. We can and must do better in embracing our knowledge-based economy.

The Utah College of Applied Technology was created to be responsive to industry and meet the demands of a growing technical workforce. While there are still issues to be ironed out, but we all agree on the goal: a UCAT system that is more responsive to real-time business needs and is more accessible to Utah's students.

Source: Utah 2009 State of the State address Jan 27, 2009

Jon Huntsman: Early learning is critical; so are languages & math

Early childhood learning is critical for their long-term success, quality of life and our state's competitive edge in attracting world-class jobs. Early results indicate kindergarten students are 6 times better prepared for a successful first grade experience if they attended full-day kindergarten.

We are leading the nation in educating our kids in 21st century languages like Chinese and Arabic. So, to the thousands of students studying Mandarin Chinese I say: Gongx gongx. "Congratulations!"

Yet, our kids' literacy in these critical foreign languages must be matched by their mastery of numbers, an area that is in need of strengthening. We must keep pace. Through additional emphasis and reprioritizing, I have asked both public and higher ed to make this year the "Year of Math."

Source: Utah 2009 State of the State address Jan 27, 2009

Jon Huntsman: To produce first-rate students, pay for first-rate teachers

Our strong economy now allows us the opportunity to fortify our foundations for the future. These foundations--which include education, the economy, quality of life, and governance--each has a set of reinforcing fundamentals. The first foundation is education.

When I speak of focusing on our fundamentals, I speak of teacher compensation. Teaching must be reinforced as being among the most noble of pursuits. We must compensate fairly those who inspire our next generation of Utahns. If we hope to produce first-rate students, we must have first-rate teachers.

Educational excellence begins with the recruitment, retention and commitment of teachers who are passionate about educating our youth--the only future we have. I refuse to stand by idly as we lose good educators to other states in our region. Together with my colleagues in the legislature, we have made significant strides in bolstering education the last two years. We can do more. We must do more.

Source: Utah 2007 State of the State address Jan 16, 2007

Jon Huntsman: School choice & competition is healthy for public schools

School choice is a top priority. The Special Needs Scholarship Bill should be passed, including broader student categories & participation. This legislation will provide a marketplace test for tuition tax credits to assess the impact of education choice on Utah schools.

We must be mindful that 97% of Utahís students are enrolled in public schools. Itís imperative that we keep them strong. Competition is healthy and certainly does not exclude mutually beneficial dialogue that shares ideas, techniques % problem solving tools to improve our childrenís education. Failure to attempt improvement in education through market forces means that we are not striving to improve our childrenís opportunities for learning.

Partnerships between public education and the business community are beneficial and should be strengthened as a potential source of revenue. The private sector has developed and continues to develop practices and methods applicable to education, which can be shared with educators and parents.

Source: Gubernatorial website, www.utah.gov/governor/ Nov 11, 2006

Mike Leavitt: Emphasize market relevance in state colleges

Our education emphasis can not stop in our primary grades. All Utahns need access to higher education. We are expanding our system of branch campuses, and increasing the velocity of our entire system. I have challenged the Board of Regents to reduce the time students take to get a 4-year degree to 4-years. We also need to double in five years and triple in eight years the number of engineering, computer science and tech graduates in Utah universities, colleges and applied technology centers.

Let this be the beginning of a new emphasis on market relevance in the allocation of resources at our colleges and universities. I have proposed an aggressive building program to add the physical capacity on our campuses, and funding to assure we have qualified faculty and up-to-date equipment. We need 15,000 engineering and computer science students by 2005.Our economic future depends on it.

Source: 2001 State of the State address to the Utah legislature Jan 16, 2001

Mike Leavitt: 14.8% increase in funding for public education

Education and economic expansion have never been closer allies. For that reason, I have proposed a four-year education improvement plan starting this year with a giant step forward in funding, 14.8%. The plan calls for more textbooks, class size reduction and paying teachers equivalent with other professionals.
Source: 2001 State of the State address to the Utah legislature Jan 16, 2001

Mike Leavitt: U-PASS: Accountability and skills testing in every grade

By the end of next year, we will have put into operation our accountability system, U-PASS. Students will be tested continually to assure they are learning the necessary skills, especially in reading. Every child will read at grade level, or we will provide extra help until they do. Special consideration needs to be given to the progress of our ethnic minority students. We are losing too many of them.
Source: 2001 State of the State address to the Utah legislature Jan 16, 2001

  • The above quotations are from State of Utah Politicians: Archives.
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2012 Presidential contenders on Education:
  Democrats:
Pres.Barack Obama(IL)
V.P.Joe Biden(DE)

Republicans:
Gov.Mitt Romney(MA)
Rep.Paul Ryan(WI)
Third Parties:
Green: Dr.Jill Stein(MA)
Libertarian: Gov.Gary Johnson(NM)
Justice: Mayor Rocky Anderson(UT)
Constitution: Rep.Virgil Goode(VA)
Peace+Freedom: Roseanne Barr(HI)
Reform Party: André Barnett(NY)
AmericansElect: Gov.Buddy Roemer(LA)
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Page last updated: Dec 17, 2013