State of Washington Archives: on Gun Control


Mark Warner: Strong defender of the Second Amendment

Noting that he has been a strong defender of the Second Amendment, Warner said he agrees with efforts in Congress to seize control of the District’s handgun regulation. Warner agreed with Gilmore that D.C. officials appear to be trying to get around the Supreme Court ruling that the city’s ban on handguns was unconstitutional.
Source: 2008 VA Senate debate reported in Washington Post Sep 19, 2008

Mike Bloomberg: Sued New York City gun dealers to control guns

Bloomberg supports gun control, has raised taxes, backs same-sex marriage and signed a law banning the use of trans fats in fast-food restaurants. The mayor once filed suit on behalf of the city against two dozen gun dealers.
Source: Michael D. Shear, Washington Post, p. A1 Mar 25, 2007

John Kerry: Supports 2nd Amendment, but wants to ban assault weapons

Let me be clear. I support the Second Amendment. I am a gun owner. I am a hunter. {Kerry justified the ban because no hunter uses assault weapons.} George Bush chose to make the job of terrorists easier, and the job of police officers harder.
Source: Editorial in Washington Times Sep 15, 2004

Dick Gephardt: Leading Dems distance themselves from divisive gun debate

Democratic presidential candidates are distancing themselves from tough gun control, reversing a decade of rhetoric and advocacy by the Democratic Party in favor of federal regulation of firearms.

Howard Dean proudly tells audiences that the NRA endorsed him as governor of Vermont, and that he would leave most gun laws to the states. Dick Gephardt, a longtime gun control advocate, is careful to highlight his support for law-abiding gun owners. John Edwards says, “Guns are about independence. They don’t want people messing with that.“

As a result, Democratic strategists predict the debate over gun laws in this campaign will be less divisive. Democrats might fight for narrow proposals to make guns safer and more difficult for children and criminals to obtain, they said, yet voters are likely to hear as much about enforcing existing gun laws as creating new ones-a position Republicans and the NRA have pushed for years.

Source: [X-ref Edwards] Jim VandeHei, Washington Post, p. A1 Oct 26, 2003

Dick Gephardt: No additional authority for federal gun agency

Rep. Richard A. Gephardt, a longtime gun control advocate, is careful to highlight his support for law-abiding gun owners. The Missouri Democrat said he is not interested in giving the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives more authority to investigate gun crimes, a top priority for the gun control activist. “They have enough,” he said in an interview.
Source: Jim VandeHei, Washington Post, p. A1 Oct 26, 2003

Howard Dean: Leading Dems distance themselves from divisive gun debate

Democratic presidential candidates are distancing themselves from tough gun control, reversing a decade of rhetoric and advocacy by the Democratic Party in favor of federal regulation of firearms.

Howard Dean proudly tells audiences that the NRA endorsed him as governor of Vermont, and that he would leave most gun laws to the states. Dick Gephardt, a longtime gun control advocate, is careful to highlight his support for law-abiding gun owners. John Edwards says, “Guns are about independence. They don’t want people messing with that.“

As a result, Democratic strategists predict the debate over gun laws in this campaign will be less divisive. Democrats might fight for narrow proposals to make guns safer and more difficult for children and criminals to obtain, they said, yet voters are likely to hear as much about enforcing existing gun laws as creating new ones-a position Republicans and the NRA have pushed for years.

Source: [X-ref Edwards] Jim VandeHei, Washington Post, p. A1 Oct 26, 2003

John Edwards: Leading Dems distance themselves from divisive gun debate

Democratic presidential candidates are distancing themselves from tough gun control, reversing a decade of rhetoric and advocacy by the Democratic Party in favor of federal regulation of firearms.

Howard Dean proudly tells audiences that the NRA endorsed him as governor of Vermont, and that he would leave most gun laws to the states. Dick Gephardt, a longtime gun control advocate, is careful to highlight his support for law-abiding gun owners. John Edwards says, “Guns are about independence. They don’t want people messing with that.“

As a result, Democratic strategists predict the debate over gun laws in this campaign will be less divisive. Democrats might fight for narrow proposals to make guns safer and more difficult for children and criminals to obtain, they said, yet voters are likely to hear as much about enforcing existing gun laws as creating new ones-a position Republicans and the NRA have pushed for years.

Source: Jim VandeHei, Washington Post, p. A1 Oct 26, 2003

John Edwards: Guns are about independence-don’t mess with that

“It’s very important for us as Democrats to understand that where I come from guns are about a lot more than guns themselves,” said John Edwards. “They are about independence. For a lot of people who work hard for a living, one of the few things they feel they have any control over is whether they can buy a gun and hunt. They don’t want people messing with that, which I understand.”
Source: Jim VandeHei, Washington Post, p. A1 Oct 26, 2003

Wesley Clark: Supports ban on assault weapons

Clark said he supports a ban on assault weapons and was uncertain of precisely what the Brady gun law does -- and if any changes to it are needed. The law requires background checks and waiting periods for gun purchases.
Source: Jim VandeHei, Washington Post, p. A5 Sep 19, 2003

Wesley Clark: Supports the Second Amendment and uses guns himself

“I support the Second Amendment. People like firearms, they feel secure with firearms, they should keep their firearms,” said Clark, who has been shooting weapons since he was young.
Source: Jim VandeHei, Washington Post, p. A5 Sep 19, 2003

John Ashcroft: Unequivocal individual gun rights, but restrictions ok

Two advocacy groups plan to file an ethics complaint today against John Ashcroft, arguing that a recent letter from Ashcroft to the National Rifle Association improperly undermines the government’s position in a pending court case. Ashcroft wrote in a May 17 letter to the NRA that he “unequivocally” believes the Constitution protects the right of individuals to own guns. In a Texas case, the US government has argued the opposite, maintaining that the right to own a gun contained in the Second Amendment is a collective, not individual, right.

Ashcroft said in his letter that he “cannot comment on any pending litigation,” but the complaint argues that the rest of his comments have the effect of undermining such litigation. A Justice Department spokeswoman said that Ashcroft “believes there’s an individual right to own a gun, but there are also reasonable restrictions. The two are not mutually exclusive.”

Source: Dan Eggen, Washington Post, Page A17 Jul 3, 2001

Charles Schumer: Cutting record-keeping limits fosters gun sale fraud & abuse

Attorney General John Ashcroft announced plans to slash the length of time that the government can keep records on instant background checks for gun buyers. The proposal, which infuriated gun control advocates, calls for such records to be held for only one business day after a sale. Ashcroft said , “The intent of the law is to protect the privacy of legitimate gun purchasers.”

Law enforcement agencies can retain records for up to 180 days. The time limit is to drop to 90 days next week. The plan drew immediate criticism from Democratic lawmakers, who accused the Bush administration of pandering to gun dealers and the NRA. “This is the most disappointing news we’ve received in the fight to bring rationality to our guns and laws,” said Sen. Charles Schumer (D, NY), who vowed to fight the plan. Schumer and other gun control advocates argued the records should be kept for a reasonable time to help law enforcement agencies uncover fraud and abuse in gun sales.

Source: Cheryl W. Thompson, Washington Post, p. A2 Jun 29, 2001

John Ashcroft: Cut record-keeping to one day for background checks

Attorney General John Ashcroft announced plans to slash the length of time that the government can keep records on instant background checks for gun buyers. The proposal, which infuriated gun control advocates, calls for such records to be held for only one business day after a sale. Ashcroft said , “The intent of the law is to protect the privacy of legitimate gun purchasers.”

Law enforcement agencies can retain records for up to 180 days. The time limit is to drop to 90 days next week. The plan drew immediate criticism from Democratic lawmakers, who accused the Bush administration of pandering to gun dealers and the NRA. “This is the most disappointing news we’ve received in the fight to bring rationality to our guns and laws,” said Sen. Charles Schumer (D, NY), who vowed to fight the plan. Schumer and other gun control advocates argued the records should be kept for a reasonable time to help law enforcement agencies uncover fraud and abuse in gun sales.

Source: Cheryl W. Thompson, Washington Post, p. A2 Jun 29, 2001

Ezola Foster: Focus on Constitution: No infringement of gun rights

Q: Where does the Reform Party stand on gun control?

A: We go back to our Constitution. We support the right to keep and bear arms which is guaranteed by the Constitution. The federal government is prohibited from infringing on that right in any way. I have more lady friends now that are carrying concealed weapons to protect themselves. The criminals will always have a means to perform their criminal acts. The Second Amendment is to protect citizens and to allow citizens to protect themselves.

Source: Interview on “Free Media”, Washington Post Aug 29, 2000

George W. Bush: Assault weapon OK; waiting period not OK

Bush expressed support for some gun control measures, including the ban on assault weapons and laws designed to keep guns out of the hands of juveniles. But he said he did not believe the waiting period for the purchase of handguns that is part of the Brady Act does much good, saying he prefers instant background checks.
Source: Dan Balz, The Washington Post Apr 25, 1999

George W. Bush: Concealed Carry needed in our dangerous society

With many Americans alarmed by the proliferation of guns, Bush defended his support for legislation in Texas that allows a person to carry a concealed weapon. “We live in a dangerous society,” Bush said. “People feel like they need to defend themselves.. We need to know who they are and they should be licensed and trained.” He added that the concealed-carry law addresses “the act of someone protecting themselves as opposed to the purchasing and spread of guns.”
Source: Dan Balz, The Washington Post Apr 25, 1999

  • The above quotations are from State of Washington Politicians: Archives.
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2016 Presidential contenders on Gun Control:
  Democrats:
Secy.Hillary Clinton(NY)
V.P.Joe Biden(DE)
Gov.Andrew Cuomo(NY)
Mayor Rahm Emanuel(IL)
Gov.Martin O`Malley(MD)

Republicans:
Amb.John Bolton(MD)
Gov.Jeb Bush(FL)
Dr.Ben Carson(MD)
Gov.Chris Christie(NJ)
Sen.Ted Cruz(TX)
Gov.Mike Huckabee(AR)
Gov.Jon Huntsman(UT)
Gov.Bobby Jindal(LA)
Rep.Peter King(NY)
Gov.Sarah Palin(AK)
Sen.Rand Paul(KY)
Gov.Rick Perry(TX)
Sen.Rob Portman(OH)
Secy.Condi Rice(CA)
Sen.Marco Rubio(FL)
Rep.Paul Ryan(WI)
Sen.Rick Santorum(PA)
2016 Third Party Candidates:
Mayor Michael Bloomberg(I-NYC)
Gov.Gary Johnson(L-NM)
Donald Trump(NY)
Gov.Jesse Ventura(I-MN)
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Page last updated: Mar 29, 2014