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Terry McAuliffe on Government Reform

Democratic nominee for Governor; previously DNC Chair

 


Photo ID law made it significantly harder to vote

Any effort to build a stronger economy and society must begin with giving as many Virginians as possible a full voice in that society. Unfortunately, here in Virginia and across the nation, too many laws have been passed that are designed to restrict access to democracy rather than expand it.

When it was passed, our photo ID law made it significantly harder for many Virginians to vote, without any evidence that voter fraud is a problem in Virginia. And so this year I hope we will repeal it.

I will also submit legislation this session to allow no-excuse in-person absentee voting, and to add a new excuse for absentee by-mail for child caregivers. These reforms are based on a simple principle: That Virginia is strongest when we are working together to make it easier to vote, not harder.

Source: 2017 State of the State address to Virginia Legislature , Jan 11, 2017

Grant voting rights to 200,000 released convicted felons

Virginia is granting more than 200,000 convicted felons the right to vote in the November elections, part of a large-scale effort Gov. Terry McAuliffe says is intended to reverse the state's long history of suppressing the voting rights of African-Americans.

The move, part of an executive order, expands voting rights to every Virginia felon who has completed their sentences and any parole or probation. It will also allow ex-offenders to run for public office, to serve on a jury, and to become a notary public.

The denial of rights has a particularly bitter history in Virginia, the governor says. "Too often in both our distant and recent history, politicians have used their authority to restrict people's ability to participate in our democracy," he said in a statement. "Today we are reversing that disturbing trend and restoring the rights of more than 200,000 of our fellow Virginians, who work, raise families and pay taxes in every corner of our Commonwealth."

Source: Christian Science Monitor on 2017 Virginia governor race , Apr 22, 2016

$100 cap on gifts to public officials & families

On my first day in office I honored a campaign promise and placed a $100 cap on gifts that can be given to myself, my family, members of my administration, and their families. I am confident that by the time we adjourn, we will have made a $100 cap on all gifts the standard for all Virginia public officials. With that gift cap, we should also establish a bipartisan ethics review commission with real investigative powers to offer guidance on the law and identify and sanction those who violate it.

I also hope you will pass my proposal to prohibit fundraising activity both in regular and special sessions. Right now, the only thing that makes special sessions special is that we can still raise money.

Additionally, this session is our opportunity to adopt the commonsense position that people who sit on boards or commissions should be prohibited from voting on matters that benefit themselves, their family members or their business partners.

Source: State of the State address to 2015 Virginia Legislature , Jan 14, 2015

I favor a ban on soft money

In 2001 Congress was likely to pass major campaign finance reform. In politics, soft money is the term for big checks. The idea was that the DNC and RNC needed money for party-building and those funds, called soft money, could come from any source in any amount. Hard money came from individuals and was limited to $25,000 per person to the national party per election cycle.

No one was sure if campaign finance would really pass, but I'd said all along that I favored a ban on soft money. I had a reputation as the king of soft money because of some of the high-profile large-donor fund-raising I'd done during the Clinton years, but over the course of my more than 20 years raising money, more than 90% was small, individual checks.

Source: What A Party!, by Terry McAuliffe, p.281-282 , Jan 23, 2007

Voluntary public financing for all general elections.

McAuliffe adopted the manifesto, "A New Agenda for the New Decade":

Return Politics to the People
At a time when much of the world is emulating American values and institutions, too many Americans have lost confidence in their political system. They are turned off by a partisan debate that often seems to revolve not around opposing philosophies but around contending sets of interest groups. They believe that our current system for financing campaigns gives disproportionate power to wealthy individuals and groups and exerts too much influence over legislative and regulatory outcomes.

The time for piecemeal reform is past. As campaign costs soar at every level, we need to move toward voluntary public financing of all general elections and press broadcasters to donate television time to candidates.

The Internet holds tremendous potential for making campaigns less expensive and more edifying and for engaging Americans directly in electoral politics. We should promote the Internet as a new vehicle for political communication and champion online voting.

Source: The Hyde Park Declaration 00-DLC9 on Aug 1, 2000

Other governors on Government Reform: Terry McAuliffe on other issues:
VA Gubernatorial:
Bob McDonnell
Frank Wagner
Ken Cuccinelli
Robert Sarvis
Tim Kaine
Tom Perriello
VA Senatorial:
Ed Gillespie
James Webb
Mark Warner
Robert Sarvis
Tim Kaine

Gubernatorial Debates 2017:
NJ: Fulop(D) vs.Lesniak(D) vs.Wisniewski(D) vs.Ciattarelli(R) vs.Guadagno(R) vs.Rullo(R)
VA: Gillespie(R) vs.Wittman(R) vs.Wagner(R) vs.Northam(D) vs.Perriello(D)
Gubernatorial Debates 2018:
AK: Walker(i) vs.(no opponent yet)
AL: (no candidate yet)
AR: Hutchinson(R) vs.(no opponent yet)
AZ: Ducey(R) vs.(no opponent yet)
CA: Newsom(D) vs.Chiang(D) vs.Istvan(I) vs.Villaraigosa(D)
CO: Johnston(D) vs.(no opponent yet)
CT: Malloy(D) vs.(no opponent yet)
FL: (no candidate yet)
GA: (no candidate yet)
HI: Ige(D) vs.(no opponent yet)
IA: Kim_Reynolds(R) vs.(no opponent yet)
ID: Little(R) vs.Fulcher(R)
IL: Rauner(R) vs.Kennedy(D) vs.Pawar(D)
KS: (no candidate yet)
MA: Baker(R) vs.(no opponent yet)
MD: Hogan(R) vs.(no opponent yet)
ME: (no candidate yet)
MI: Whitmer(R) vs.(no opponent yet)
MN: Coleman(D) vs.Murphy(D) vs.Otto(D)
NE: Ricketts(R) vs.(no opponent yet)
NH: Sununu(R) vs.(no opponent yet)
NM: Grisham(D) vs.(no opponent yet)
NV: (no candidate yet)
NY: Cuomo(R) vs.(no opponent yet)
OH: DeWine(R) vs.(no opponent yet)
OK: (no candidate yet)
OR: Brown(D) vs.(no opponent yet)
PA: Wolf(D) vs.Wagner(R)
RI: Raimondo(D) vs.(no opponent yet)
SC: McMaster(R) vs.(no opponent yet)
SD: Noem(R) vs.(no opponent yet)
TN: Green(R) vs.(no opponent yet)
TX: Abbott(R) vs.(no opponent yet)
VT: Scott(R) vs.(no opponent yet)
WI: Walker(R) vs.(no opponent yet)
WY: (no candidate yet)
Newly-elected governors (first seated in Jan. 2017):
DE-D: Carney
IN-R: Holcomb
MO-R: Greitens
NH-R: Sununu
NC-D: Cooper
ND-R: Burgum
VT-R: Scott
WV-D: Justice

Retiring 2017-18:
AL-R: Robert Bentley(R)
(term-limited 2018)
CA-D: Jerry Brown
(term-limited 2018)
CO-D: John Hickenlooper
(term-limited 2018)
FL-R: Rick Scott
(term-limited 2018)
GA-R: Nathan Deal
(term-limited 2018)
IA-R: Terry Branstad
(appointed ambassador, 2017)
ID-R: Butch Otter
(retiring 2018)
KS-R: Sam Brownback
(term-limited 2018)
ME-R: Paul LePage
(term-limited 2018)
MI-R: Rick Snyder
(term-limited 2018)
MN-D: Mark Dayton
(retiring 2018)
NM-R: Susana Martinez
(term-limited 2018)
OH-R: John Kasich
(term-limited 2018)
OK-R: Mary Fallin
(term-limited 2018)
SC-R: Nikki Haley
(appointed ambassador, 2017)
SD-R: Dennis Daugaard
(term-limited 2018)
TN-R: Bill Haslam
(term-limited 2018)
WY-R: Matt Mead
(term-limited 2018)
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Page last updated: Feb 22, 2017