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Republican primaries: IA WY NH MI NV SC FL ME Feb.5 Feb.9 Feb.12 Feb.19-21 Mar.4 Done!

Democratic primaries: IA NH MI NV FL Feb.5 Feb.9-10 Feb.12 Feb.19-24 Mar.4 Apr.22 May 13 May 20 Done!
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SenateMatch quizzes posted: June 20th, 2008

Match your issue stances in 33 Senate races

Our coverage of 35 Senate races in 33 states begins officially today. Click here to match your issue stances against the Senate candidates, or click below to see how each one answers the VoteMatch quiz individually.

AK:Stevens v.Begich v.Cuddy v.Sikma
AL:Sessions v.Figures
AR:Pryor v.Kennedy
CO:Schaffer v.Udall
DE:Biden v.O`Donnell
GA:Chambliss v.Cardwell v.Jones v.Buckley
IA:Harkin v.Reed
ID:Risch v.LaRocco
IL:Durbin v.Sauerberg v.Stafford
KS:Roberts v.Jones v.Slattery
KY:McConnell v.Lunsford
LA:Landrieu v.Kennedy
MA:Kerry v.O`Reilly v.Beatty
ME:Collins v.Allen
MI:Levin v.Hoogendyk
MN:Coleman v.Franken v.Ventura v.Cavlan v.Pallmeyer
MS4:Wicker v.Musgrove
MS6:Cochran v.Fleming

MT:Baucus v.Kelleher
NC:Dole v.Hagan
NE:Johanns v.Kleeb v.Raimondo
NH:Sununu v.Shaheen
NJ:Lautenberg v.Zimmer
NM:Wilson v.Pearce v.Udall
OR:Smith v.Merkley v.Frohnmayer
OK:Inhofe v.Rice
RI:Reed
SC:Graham v.Cone
SD:Johnson v.Dykstra
TN:Alexander v.Padgett v.Tuke v.Lugo
TX:Cornyn v.Noriega v.Jameson
VA:Gilmore v.Warner v.Marshall
WV:Rockefeller v.Wolfe
WY4:Barrasso v.Carter
WY6:Enzi v.Rothfuss
Source: OnTheIssues.org VoteMatch quizzes
Click for all 33 SenateMatch quizzes.


Hillary Clinton withdraws: June 7, 2008


Let the Veepstakes begin: Dem. V.P. VoteMatch quiz and GOP V.P. VoteMatch quiz

18 million of you from all walks of life – women and men, young and old, Latino and Asian, African-American and Caucasian, rich, poor and middle class, gay and straight – you have stood strong with me. And I will continue to stand strong with you, every time, every place, and every way that I can. The dreams we share are worth fighting for.

I entered this race because I have an old-fashioned conviction: that public service is about helping people solve their problems and live their dreams. I’ve had every opportunity and blessing in my own life – and I want the same for all Americans. Until that day comes, you will always find me on the front lines of democracy – fighting for the future.

The way to continue our fight now – to accomplish the goals for which we stand – is to take our energy, our passion, our strength and do all we can to help elect Barack Obama the next President of the United States.

Today, as I suspend my campaign, I congratulate him on the victory he has won and the extraordinary race he has run. I endorse him, and throw my full support behind him. And I ask all of you to join me in working as hard for Barack Obama as you have for me.

Although we weren’t able to shatter that highest, hardest glass ceiling this time, thanks to you, it’s got about 18 million cracks in it. And the light is shining through like never before, filling us all with the hope and the sure knowledge that the path will be a little easier next time. That has always been the history of progress in America.

Source: Speech to supporters in Washington DC, on campaign website, www.hillaryclinton.com
Click for complete records of Hillary Clinton's or Barack Obama's issue stances.


Oregon & Kentucky Primary results: May 20th, 2008

Hillary wins landslide in Kentucky, but Obama forms V.P. search committee

    Below are the delegate counts for states voting on May 20.

  • Sen. Obama lost the Kentucky primary even more badly than he lost West Virginia. But Sen. Obama quietly formed a Vice Presidential selection committee the next day. The speculation:

  • Obama has asked Jim Johnson to head up a quiet search for a running mate. Johnson played similar roles for Walter Mondale and John Kerry. The delicate issue for Obama, of course, is Hillary Clinton. There's a lot of pressure from Democrats that, if the math holds and Obama becomes the nominee, he pick the former first lady.

  • The Atlantic's Marc Ambinder, who first ferreted out news of Obama's quiet efforts, offers a list of potential contenders, beyond Clinton.
StateObama delegatesClinton delegates
Kentucky (May 20)1437
Oregon (May 20)3121
Total delegates as of May 201,9181,776
Source: Numerous sources including L.A. Times blog for Obama speculation


John Edwards endorses Barack Obama: May 14th, 2008

Breaks silence since withdrawal from presidential race in January

Former Democratic presidential candidate John Edwards has endorsed Sen. Barack Obama in the race for the Democratic presidential nomination.

Edwards ended his second bid for the White House in January after failing to win any of the early state nominating contests.

Following are five facts about the former North Carolina senator, who fashioned himself as a champion of workers and the poor and a critic of Republican policies he said favoured the rich and corporate America.

  • The boyish-looking 54-year-old was the Democratic nominee for vice president in 2004, running with presidential nominee John Kerry. He was credited with bringing energy and charisma to his party's bid to unseat President George W. Bush and Vice President Dick Cheney.

  • The son of a textile worker and the first person in his family to attend college, Edwards became a millionaire personal injury lawyer known for winning big damage awards from corporations and hospitals.

  • His wife, Elizabeth, is being treated for a recurrence of cancer. They have three children. A teenage son died in a car crash in 1996.

  • This year, he edged out rival Hillary Clinton to come in second in the Iowa caucuses, but placed third in subsequent races in New Hampshire, Nevada and South Carolina.

  • Edwards, who would later be criticized by political opponents for paying $400 for a haircut, was named the sexiest U.S. politician by People magazine in 2000.
Source: Reuters (U.K.)
Click for complete record of John Edwards's issue stances or Barack Obama's issue stances.


West Virginia Primary results: May 13th, 2008

Hillary wins West Virginia, but we're still calling Obama the nominee-in-waiting!

    Below are the delegate counts for states voting as of May 13.

  • Sen. Obama lost the West Virginia primary badly, but in the weeks since the Pennsylvania primary, many superdelegates have declared their support, even including some who previously supported Sen. Clinton.

  • Immediately prior to the West Virginia primary, Sen. Obama pulled ahead in the superdelegate count for the first time, eroding Sen. Clinton's last chance at winning the nomination.

  • But Sen. Clinton will undoubtedly stay in the race through the last primary in June in Puerto Rico, for several good reasons:
    • Her delegate total will increase more if she stays in the race (fewer people will vote for her if she drops out)
    • Her delegate total at the convention gives her power -- she needs as much cushion as possible because some delegates will defect.
    • With sufficient delegate strength to force a "brokered convention" (i.e. if Sen. Obama cannot exceed 50% on the first ballot, which requries 2,026 delegates), Sen. Clinton can negotiate for a position such as Vice President or a cabinet post, or anything she wants.
    • Her delegate total PRIOR to the convention gives her power, too -- in determining the content of the Party Platform, for example, which is written by delegates!
  • In summary, there is no good reason to drop out, and plenty of good reason to stay in, so obviously Sen. Clinton will stay in. We predict she will stop attacking Sen. Obama and be much more positive, to "heal wounds" and further strengthen her negotiating position.
StateObama delegatesClinton delegates
West Virginia (May 13)820
Delegates elected prior to May 131,5921,425
Superdelegates as of May 13284273
Total delegates as of May 131,8841,718
Source: Numerous sources, and we know it's not all perfect!


Bob Barr announces for Libertarian nomination: May 12th, 2008

Former Congressman quit Republican Party in 2006

Former Republican Rep. Bob Barr launched a Libertarian Party presidential bid Monday, saying voters are hungry for an alternative to the status quo who would dramatically cut the federal government.

His candidacy throws a wild card into the White House race that many believe could peel away votes from Republican Sen. John McCain given the candidates' similar positions on fiscal policy. Barr, who has hired Ross Perot's former campaign manager, acknowledged that some Republicans have tried to discourage him from running. But he said he's getting in the race to win, not to play spoiler or to make a point.

Barr first must win the Libertarian nomination at the party's national convention that begins May 22. Party officials consider him a front-runner thanks to the national profile he developed as a Georgia congressman from 1995 to 2003. Barr, 59, quit the Republican Party two years ago, saying he had grown disillusioned with its failure to shrink government and its willingness to scale back civil liberties in fighting terrorism. He has been particularly critical of President Bush over the war in Iraq and says the administration is ignoring constitutional protections on due process and privacy.

While in Congress, he was a persistent critic of President Clinton and was among the first to press for impeaching the former president. He helped manage House Republicans' impeachment case before the Senate. He lost his seat to fellow Republican Rep. John Linder in 2002 after a redistricting. He then opened a lobbying and public affairs firm with offices in Atlanta and outside Washington.

The 2004 Libertarian presidential candidate, Michael Badnarik, took less than 1 percent of the vote, placing fourth behind President Bush, Democrat John Kerry and Independent Ralph Nader.

Source: Ben Evans, Associated Press
Click for complete record of Bob Barr's issue stances.


Democratic vice presidential speculation: May 9th, 2008

Links to Obama's potential running-mates

Following is a Huffington Post columnist's opinion on Obama's V.P. choices. OnTheIssues.org predicts Bill Bradley as the best choice demographically and to complement Obama's strengths and weaknesses. But please look over their issue positions and decide for yourself!

With the Democratic nomination now in its endgame, it's time to speculate on that question that makes politicos weak at the knees: who will be tapped to be vice president? We've identified 10 possible VP choices for Obama, as well as the general criteria that might guide his decision.
    WHAT TO LOOK FOR IN A VEEP:
  • Location, location, location
  • Strong anti-war record
  • Post-partisan record
  • Complementing record

Source: Will Thomas, The Huffington Post
Click for complete records of Barack Obama's issue stances.


Pennsylvania Primary results: April 22nd, 2008

Hillary wins Pennsylvania, but we're declaring Obama the nominee-in-waiting

    Below are the delegate counts for states voting in March & April.

  • After months of OnTheIssues focusing on the delegate count, the mainstream media has come to agree that delegates are important. Hence our coverage is no longer needed -- you can see the delegate counts now, hour-by-hour, on TV and in the newspapers.

  • It has also become apparent that Sen. Obama will win the nomination, despite Sen. Clinton's big victory in Pennsylvania. We base this judgment on -- what else? -- the delegate count. Prior to the Pennsylvania primary, Sen. Clinton had a substantial lead in superdelegates, and if one extrapolated the same ratio to the undeclared superdelegates, Sen. Clinton still had a chance at winning the nomination. After the Pennsylvania primary, superdelegates started endorsing Sen. Obama in a much higher ratio, and Sen. Clinton's chances for prevailing thus faded.

  • It is still possible that Sen. Clinton will keep enough delegates to force a brokered convention (i.e., Sen. Obama does not have enough delegates to exceed 50% on the first-ballot, which requries 2,026 delegates). That's especially true if the Democratic Party Credentials Committee seats Michigan and Florida delegates in a manner favorable for Sen. Clinton, as seems very likely. But without a substantial superdelegate lead, Sen. Clinton no longer has a chance for a 50% first-ballot victory herself.

  • Hence we terminate our primary coverage -- we'll report here later Democratic Party events, but we're going to focus now on building up our website on the upcoming Senate races!
StateObama delegatesClinton delegates
North Carolina (May 6)6550
Indiana (May 6)3538
Pennsylvania (Apr.22)7385
Mississippi (Mar.11)2013
Wyoming caucus(Mar.8)75
Delegates elected March 8-May 6200191
Delegates prior to March 814691443
Total Delegates16691634
Source: Numerous sources, and we know it's not all perfect!


Mike Gravel announces for Libertarian nomination: March 26th, 2008

Former Senator quits Democratic Party

Former Alaska Sen. Mike Gravel has abandoned his bid to be the Democratic presidential candidate and now hopes to be the nominee of the Libertarian Party. Gravel said he is joining the Libertarian ranks because it “is a party that combines a commitment to freedom and peace that can’t be found in the two major parties that control the government and politics of America.

“My libertarian views, as well as my strong stance against war, the military industrial complex and American imperialism, seem not to be tolerated by Democratic Party elites who are out of touch with the average American; elites that reject the empowerment of American citizens I offered to the Democratic Party at the beginning of this presidential campaign with the National Initiative for Democracy,” he said in a statement. In an e-mail to supporters, Gravel, 77, wrote, “I look forward to advancing my presidential candidacy within the Libertarian Party, which is considerably closer to my values, my foreign policy views and my domestic views.”

Texas Rep. Ron Paul is a lifetime member of the Libertarian Party but is running as a Republican presidential candidate. Paul was the Libertarian Party presidential candidate in 1988. 15 candidates are on the slate for the Libertarian Party nomination, which will be determined at the May 22-26 national convention in Denver, Colo.

A Libertarian Party spokesperson said Gravel isn’t “a perfect libertarian” but he supports essentials of the party — opposing a military draft, empowering the American voter and standing against “the war of American imperialism.”

Source: FoxNews.com
Click for complete record of Mike Gravel's issue stances.


Bill Richardson endorses Barack Obama: March 21, 2008

Snubs Bill & Hillary Clinton

Declaring that Sen. Barack Obama is an "extraordinary American," Gov. Bill Richardson of New Mexico endorsed Obama for the Democratic nominee for president. Richardson sought this year's Democratic nomination for president himself.

Richardson praised Obama for his speech this week on race in America, saying "he appealed to the best in us." "As a Hispanic-American, I was particularly touched by his words," Richardson said, putting his arm around Obama and declaring in Spanish that he is "a man who understands us." Richardson is the nation's only Hispanic governor. Hispanics have tended to support Sen. Hillary Clinton in her quest for the Democratic nomination.

Obama and Clinton both lobbied Richardson for his endorsement after he dropped out of the race January 10. Richardson called Clinton Thursday to tell her of his decision, Clinton's campaign said. The campaign shrugged off Richardson's endorsement of her rival. Richardson was secretary of energy and U.S. ambassador to the United Nations under President Bill Clinton. He said he remains friends with the Clintons, and watched the Super Bowl with Bill Clinton this year.

Richardson's endorsement may be more important for its influence on superdelegates, the nearly 800 Democratic party officials whose backing will be essential for either candidate to win the party's nomination. As a governor, Richardson is a superdelegate.

Richardson is the second former Democratic presidential contender to endorse Obama, after Sen. Chris Dodd of Connecticut. Two other former candidates, Sen. Joe Biden of Delaware and former Sen. John Edwards of North Carolina, have remained neutral. None of the dropouts has endorsed Clinton.

Source: CNN.com
Click for complete records of Bill Richardson's or Barack Obama's issue stances.


Republican vice presidential speculation: March 13, 2008

Links to McCain's potential running-mates

Following is a Boston Globe columnist's opinion on McCain's V.P. choices. OnTheIssues.org predicts Mark Sanford as the best choice demographically and to complement McCain's strengths and weaknesses. CNN favors Haley Barbour and the Conventional Wisdom seems to favor Charlie Crist. The most "maverick" choice would be Joe Lieberman, the 2000 Democratic nominee for Vice President who is now an Independent actively supporting McCain. But please look over their issue positions and decide for yourself!

HERE'S MY RANKING of the 20 candidates - from weakest to strongest. (with scores, where 100 is the best)

McCain's VP search committee has yet to set its own criteria for screening candidates, so don't order your McCain-Pawlenty bumper sticker yet. Meanwhile, Pawlenty might find comfort and hope in what McCain said about him during the 2006 campaign: "This is the kind of leadership that I'd like to pass the torch to."

Todd Domke is a Boston area Republican political analyst, public relations strategist, and author.

Source: Todd Domke Op-Ed, Boston Globe
Click for complete records of John McCain's issue stances.


Pres. Bush endorses John McCain: March 5, 2008

McCain becomes presumptive nominee

President Bush endorsed Republican nominee-in-waiting John McCain on Wednesday, two bitter rivals from the 2000 presidential race joining together now in hopes of preventing Democrats from winning the White House this fall. Bush's embrace of the Arizona senator as the party's next standard-bearer comes a day after McCain clinched the GOP nomination by getting the requisite 1,191 convention delegates. Republicans won't officially nominate McCain until early September at the GOP's national convention in Minneapolis-St. Paul.

With his low poll ratings and an unpopular war on his shoulders, Bush could hurt McCain with some groups, while helping with others. "They're not going to be voting for me," the president said. "I've had my time in the Oval Office." "It's not about me," Bush said. "I've done my bit."

McCain's Washington visit amounted to a victory lap of sorts after a bruising 16-month Republican presidential primary. He was visiting not only the White House he hopes to occupy but also the Republican National Committee headquarters that he essentially assumes control of now that he's the expected GOP nominee. He was essentially laying claim to the entire force of the Republican Party apparatus as he plots his general election strategy and sets in motion his campaign — and that of the party — to keep a Republican at the White House helm.

For McCain, the general election campaign starts now even though Democrats still haven't chosen a candidate. Sens. Barack Obama and Hillary Rodham Clinton continue a protracted battle for their party's nod, leaving McCain an opportunity to unify his party. To that end, Bush's support sends a strong signal to GOP critics of McCain to fall in line. The GOP's conservative base has resisted rallying around McCain, long viewing him skeptically for working across the aisle with Democrats on issues that the right flank detest. Bush is the head of the Republican Party and he remains a well-liked figure with GOP rank-and-file. Thus, he could be an asset in raising money and rallying the GOP base for McCain. However, his job performance rating is at a low point and he is unpopular with the general public.

Source: Associated Press on MSNBC
Click for complete records of George W. Bush's or John McCain's issue stances.


Mike Huckabee withdraws: March 5, 2008

Endorses John McCain

Former Arkansas Governor Mike Huckabee is calling it a day -- he's dropping out of the race for the Republican presidential nomination.

Huckabee made the announcement to his supporters in Texas after John McCain clinched the needed number of delegates.

Huckabee says he telephoned McCain and offered not only his congratulations, but his commitment to both him and the Republican Party.

Huckabee praised McCain, saying he has run "an honorable campaign because he is an honorable man."

Source: Associated Press
Click for complete records of Mike Huckabee's issue stances.


This week's Primary results: March 4th, 2008

Results for 4 Republican and 5 Democratic races

    Below are the delegate counts for each state contested in the week of Feb. 19th.

  • These figures are estimates -- as are all delegate counts!

  • Texas had TWO votes, a primary and a Democratic caucus later in the same day. Voters could vote in either or both. Clinton won the primary by 1.46 million votes to 1.36 million votes; Obama won the caucuses by 24,000 votes to 19,000 votes.

  • McCain has secured the Republican nomination by surpassing the "magic number" of 1,245, which is half the pledged delegates at the RNC convention, when one adds in Romney's delegates now pledged to McCain and recent superdelegate pledges.

  • Neither Obama nor Clinton has secured the Demcoratic nomination by surpassing their "magic number" of 2,025.

  • The remaining primaries are unlikely to push either Obama or Clinton over the "magic number," so the nominee will be determined by the superdelegates, and by the decision on seating delegates from Florida and Michigan.
McCain delegatesHuckabee delegatesPaul delegatesStateObama delegatesClinton delegates
7900Ohio5971
1340Rhode Island813
121160Texas Primary6165
No Republican raceTexas Caucus3829
1700Vermont96
230200March 4 Primary Delegates175184
91222316Before Mar.4 Primary12941259
114224316Total Delegates14691443
Source: Numerous sources, and we know it's not all perfect!


Democratic debate before Ohio primary: Feb. 26, 2008

Hillary vs. Obama, one-on-one in Cleveland

Health Care
   Hillary Clinton: Include everyone, to avoid cherry-picking and its hidden tax.
   Barack Obama: Voluntary universal participation, like in Medicare Part B.
   Hillary Clinton: Without a universal mandate, it's not universal health care.
   Barack Obama: Insurers are happy to have a mandate; issue is affordability.
   Barack Obama: Hillary's plan must either be enforced, or leave out people.
   Hillary Clinton: Obama's plan includes mandate on 150 million parents.

Source: Excerpts from Cleveland Democratic debate
Click for complete debate coverage.


Ralph Nader announces for president: Feb. 24th, 2008

At announcement interview, mainstream media asks who else he prefers for President

MR. RUSSERT: Would you prefer, as an American citizen, to have Barack Obama or John McCain as president?

MR. NADER: What I prefer as an American citizen?

MR. RUSSERT: Yes.

MR. NADER: You're asking me? I'm running for president, for heaven's sake.

MR. RUSSERT: But as a citizen.

MR. NADER: I would prefer that the American people organize, that whoever is president, they give that person backbone.

Source: Meet the Press transcript
Click for complete record of Ralph Nader's issue stances.


Democratic debate before Texas primary: Feb. 21, 2008

Hillary vs. Obama, one-on-one in Austin

Foreign Policy
   Barack Obama: Meet with Cuban leaders only with agenda of US interests.
   Barack Obama: Cuba: Loosen restrictions now; normalization later.
   Hillary Clinton: Meet with Cuban leaders only after evidence of change.
   Hillary Clinton: Diplomacy with Iran & Cuba, but no presidential meetings.
Government Reform
   Barack Obama: Lobbyists & special interests have strangle-hold on agenda.
Health Care
   Hillary Clinton: Make it illegal to discriminate against sick people.

Source: Excerpts from Texas Democratic debate
Click for complete debate coverage.


This week's Primary results: Feb. 19th, 2008

Results for 4 Republican and Democratic races

    Below are the delegate counts for each state contested in the week of Feb. 19th.

  • These figures are estimates -- as are all delegate counts!

  • Washington state held a Democratic primary, but the previous Washington caucuses assigned all the delegates.

  • The "Territories/Abroad" information summarizes several separate primaries:

  • Puerto Rico, Samoa, and the Virgin Islands held Republican primary through Feb. 24.

  • The 'Democrats Abroad' primary was held by mail-in ballot through Feb. 21.
McCain delegatesHuckabee delegatesPaul delegatesStateObama delegatesClinton delegates
No Republican raceHawaii146
3800Territories/Abroad32
600Washington00
3100Wisconsin4232
7500Feb. 19 Delegates5940
83825116Before Feb. 1912351219
91225116Total Delegates12941259
Source: Numerous sources, and we know it's not all perfect!


George Bush Sr. endorses John McCain: Feb. 18, 2008

Former President says, "Now is the right time to start building [a] broad-based coalition"

George H.W. Bush stood shoulder to shoulder with John McCain on Monday, offering an endorsement to the presumptive Republican presidential nominee.

Mathematically, statistically, symbolically and politically, McCain is just inches from winning the nomination, and the former president’s endorsement offers a signal that the Republican powerhouse family is coalescing around the candidate. Former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush has already endorsed McCain for president.

“I did not come here to tell any other candidate what to do, a very wise man once said influence is something you always have until you actually try to exert it,” Bush said from the Houston Hobby Airport in Texas, where he was joined by his wife, Barbara.

“Now is the right time for me to help John in his effort to start building the broad-based coalition it will take for our conservative values to carry the White House this fall. His character was forged in the crucible of war. His commitment to America is beyond any doubt, but most importantly he has the right values and experience to guide our nation forward at this historic moment,” said the former president.

McCain campaign officials say they expect the current President Bush to endorse the candidate once he has numerically clinched the nomination.

Asked whether he thinks the Bush endorsement spells the end of his campaign, Mike Huckabee said endorsements don’t speak for the base.

Source: Carl Cameron, FOX News
Click for complete records of George Bush Sr.'s or John McCain's issue stances.


Mitt Romney endorses John McCain: Feb. 14, 2008

Asks his delegates to vote for McCain at RNC Convention

A week after ending his own presidential bid, former Massachusetts governor Mitt Romney yesterday endorsed John McCain, his onetime bitter rival, all but assuring the Arizona senator will have the delegates he needs to secure the Republican nomination.

Both sought to paper over that acrimony yesterday, saying their shared fear of Islamic terrorism and of the Democrats winning the White House dwarfed even major disagreements on immigration and other issues. "It's time for us to put aside our differences and focus on the places where we think we have common ground, and to select our nominee and to go forward on a unified basis," Romney said at a brief news conference in Boston. "Right now the Democrats are fighting. Let's come together and make progress while they're fighting."

Former Arkansas governor Mike Huckabee, who trailed McCain by 600 delegates even before Romney's endorsement, said yesterday that he is not convinced all of Romney's delegates will support McCain. Many of them, he suggested, will support him instead. As long as his supporters want him to stay in the race and promote conservative principles, Huckabee plans to do so until someone officially reaches the delegate threshold.

Source: Scott Helman, Associated Press in Boston Globe
Click for complete records of Mitt Romney's or John McCain's issue stances.


Potomac Primary results: Feb. 12th, 2008

Results for 3 Republican and Democratic races

    Below are the delegate counts for each state contested in the Potomac Primary.

  • These figures are estimates -- as are all delegate counts!

  • We add in a row for newly pledged superdelegates so that our figures match the mainstream media's reports for Obama taking the lead in total delegate count. (We average CNN, ABC, AP, and our own estimates).

  • Voters should keep in mind that momentum does not vote -- only delegates do. We would call the Democratic race a tie, because...
    1. John Edwards has 26 pledged delegates, who would most likely vote at the Convention as Edwards asks them to.
    2. The delegations from Florida (210 delegates) and Michigan (156 delegates) are currently not allowed to vote, but that is subject to change by ruling from the convention.
    3. Superdelegates are under no obligation to reveal their preference until the convention, and 466 superdelegates have not done so (only 252 have).
    4. 76 more unpledged add-on delegates (another category of superdelegate) will be selected at state conventions.
    5. Each one of those categories of delegates more than account for the difference between Obama and Clinton, and hence if the Convention were held today, the winner would be unpredictable.
McCain delegatesHuckabee delegatesPaul delegatesStateObama delegatesClinton delegates
3100Maryland4423
6000Virginia5429
1600Washington DC123
10700Potomac Primary Delegates11055
73122316Before Potomac Primary10811164
0280Recent superdelegate pledges440
83825116Total Delegates12351219
Source: Numerous sources, and we know it's not all perfect!


Super Weekend results: Feb. 9th-10th, 2008

Results for 3 Republican and 5 Democratic races

    Below are the delegate counts for each state contested on Super Weekend.

  • These figures are estimates -- as are all delegate counts!

  • * The GOP primary in Louisiana has no delegates awarded because no candidate achieved 50% of the vote.

  • ** The GOP caucus in Washington is contested (Huckabee claims that the race was declared a victory for McCain before voting ended).
McCain delegatesHuckabee delegatesPaul delegatesStateObama delegatesClinton delegates
0360KansasNo Democratic Race
0*0*0Louisiana3524
No Republican raceMaine1511
No Republican raceNebraska208
No Republican raceVirgin Islands42
0**0**0Washington4315
0360Super Weekend Delegates11760
73118716Before Super Weekend9991128
73122316Total Delegates11161188
Source: Numerous sources, and we know it's not all perfect!


Republican speeches to CPAC: Feb. 7, 2008

Mitt Romney's last campaign appearance

Abortion
   Mike Huckabee: Will lead fight for constitutional ban on abortion.
   Ron Paul: Define life at conception in law, as scientific statement.
Families & Children
   Mitt Romney: Child development enhanced by having a mother & father.
Foreign Policy
   Mike Huckabee: Impeach judges who yield on our sovereignty.
   Mitt Romney: Unless US changes course, we'll no longer be superpower.
Homeland Security
   Mitt Romney: Raise military spending to 4% of our GDP.
Principles & Values
   Mike Huckabee: Not exiting; I didn't major in math; I majored in miracles.
   Mitt Romney: Withdrawing from race to help McCain beat Democrats.
Technology
   Mike Huckabee: Post every federal expenditure on Internet without 24 hours.
War & Peace
   Mike Huckabee: Islamofascism must disappear from the face of the earth.
   Mitt Romney: To Jihadists, democracy is blasphemous since people make law.
Welfare & Poverty
   Mitt Romney: Opportunity is in our DNA; dependency is death to initiative.

Source: Excerpts from Conservative Political Action Conference speeches
Click for complete CPAC coverage.


Mitt Romney withdraws from presidential race: Feb. 7, 2008

"I hate to lose"

I disagree with Senator McCain on a number of issues, as you know. But I agree with him on doing whatever it takes to be successful in Iraq, on finding and executing Osama bin Laden, and on eliminating Al Qaeda and terror. If I fight on in my campaign, all the way to the convention, I would forestall the launch of a national campaign and make it more likely that Senator Clinton or Obama would win. And in this time of war, I simply cannot let my campaign, be a part of aiding a surrender to terror.

This is not an easy decision for me. I hate to lose. My family, my friends and our supporters – many of you right here in this room – have given a great deal to get me where I have a shot at becoming President. If this were only about me, I would go on. But I entered this race because I love America, and because I love America, I feel I must now stand aside, for our party and for our country.

I will continue to stand for conservative principles. I will fight alongside you for all the things we believe in. And one of those things is that we cannot allow the next President of the United States to retreat in the face evil extremism.

Source: Speech at CPAC, the Conservative Political Action Conference
Click for complete records of Mitt Romney's issue stances.


Super Tuesday Green Party results: Feb. 5th, 2008

OnTheIssues.org covers the two leading Green Party contenders

    Below are the delegate counts for each state reporting Green Party results for Super Tuesday.

  • These figures are estimates -- as are all delegate counts! -- we assume delegate counts are directly proportional to votes cast.

  • The Green Party race receives no coverage in the mainstream media, so our estimates are the best available.

  • In several states, "Howie Hawkins" appears on the ballot as a stand-in for Ralph Nader, who has not formally declared (but has formed an exploratory comittee). Mr. Hawkins runs a Draft Nader website.

  • The Green Part Convention, to be held in Chicago from July 10 to 13, will have approximately 836 delegates in attendance.

  • Therefore, the "magic number" to win the nomination is 419 (half the delegates plus one).
StateRalph Nader   Cynthia McKinney   
Arkansas01
California10343
Illinois725
Massachusetts1616
Total for Super Tuesday    12686
Washington DC, Feb. 1217
Total delegate estimate    12793
Source: Green Party national website, and we know our estimates it's not perfect!


Super Tuesday results: Feb. 5th, 2008

State-by-state results for 21 Republican races and 23 Democratic races

    Below are the delegate counts for each state contested on Super Tuesday.

  • These figures are estimates -- as are all delegate counts!

  • Our Democratic Party estimates exclude Michigan delegates because they will likely not be seated.

  • Our delegate estimates do not include delegates from candidates who have withdrawn. Some will likely transfer to remaining candidates.
McCain delegatesRomney delegatesHuckabee delegatesPaul delegatesStateObama delegatesClinton delegates
180230Alabama2724
31265Alaska94
No Republican raceAmerican Samoa12
53000Arizona2735
11290Arkansas827
155600California174232
04300Colorado199
27000Connecticut3123
18000Delaware96
213480Georgia6228
No Republican raceIdaho153
55300Illinois12449
No Republican raceKansas239
182200Massachusetts4662
03800Minnesota4824
58000Missouri4040
02500MontanaNo Democratic Race
52000New Jersey4971
No Republican raceNew Mexico1214
101000New York95180
6855North Dakota85
32060Oklahoma1424
1811230Tennessee3244
03600Utah149
00180West VirginiaNo Democratic Race
63620815810Super Tuesday delegates887924
9588296Before Super Tuesday112204
73129618716Overall delegates9991128
Source: Numerous sources, and we know it's not all perfect!


Understanding Super Tuesday: Feb. 5th, 2008

A Citizen's Guide to the upcoming 21 Republican races and 23 Democratic races

    The caucuses and primaries on Feb. 5 may determine the two major parties' nominees. Because the process differs in each state, OnTheIssues.org offers this guide to understanding how the delegates are allocated.

  • Each state determines its own rules for selecting delegates. In several states, the two major parties could not agree on a date (so the other party's primary or caucus is on a date other than Feb. 5).

  • The red numbers on the left indicate the number of delegates to the Republican Convention at stake. The total needed for nomination is 1,245 delegates out of 2,488 expected at the convention.

  • The blue numbers on the right indicate the number of delegates to the Democratic Convention at stake. The total needed for nomination is 2,025 delegates out of 4,049 expected at the convention (The Democratic Convention simply has more delegates than the Republican Convention -- the proportions by state are pretty much the same).

  • The "district delegates" are awarded proportionally, based on the popular vote, usually within the Congressional District. (See "WTA" and "WTA-CD" below for non-proportional systems). The "Other Delegates" are awarded based on statewide popular vote totals, and/or the individual preferences of superdelegates. The "other delegates" tend to favor party insiders.

  • Now comes the complicated part: the "Type of voting". This is where all the campaign strategy comes in. Each campaign will focus on states where the type of voting favors their candidate. The type of voting in each state is determined by each state party, depending on how much democracy they think the voters demand.

  • A "primary" means any citizen can vote individually, at any time of day, at a pre-designated voting place, and your vote is secret.

  • A "caucus" means you must show up at a semi-public location, usually a school or public building, at a specific time of the day, and plan on staying for an hour or more. Caucus votes are generally NOT secret.

  • Caucuses allow much less democracy than primaries. Parties favor them because they cost less, and favor party insiders. Caucuses exclude voters such as people who must work at the time of the caucus. They also favor the candidate with better organizing abilities (since you must get your voters to a particular place at a particular time).

  • An "open primary" or "open caucus" means more democracy. "Open" means citizens can vote in either party's primary, regardless of their party registration.

  • A "closed caucus" or "open caucus" means less democracy. You can only vote if you are registered with the party in question; no "cross-over" is allowed. Closed voting tends to favor the party insiders' favorite.

  • A "semi-open" system means SOME people can cross-over. For example, in Massachusetts, people registered as "Independent" can vote in either primary, but people registered as "Democrat" may not vote in the Republican primary.

  • "WTA" indicates a "winner-take-all" vote. Some Republican votes assign ALL the state's delegates to the one winner. Most states are "WTA-CD" -- winner-take-all within Congressional districts. We only mark the confusing "WTA-CD" states, where the two parties differ -- and California, which is widely reported as WTA but it is, in fact, WTA by district. WTA votes tend to anoint the party insiders' favorite.

  • We simplify the list for compactness -- each state has its own variations.
District GOP DelegatesOther GOP delegatesStateType of votingDistrict Dem. DelegatesOther Dem. Delegates
2127AlabamaOpen primary3426
326AlaskaClosed caucus810
No GOP raceNo GOP raceAmerican SamoaClosed primary (Dem. Only)013
2429ArizonaSemi-open primary, GOP:WTA; Dems:WTA-CD3730
1222ArkansasOpen primary2225
15914CaliforniaClosed GOP primary; semi-open Dem. primary, WTA-CD241200
2125ColoradoClosed caucus3633
1515ConnecticutClosed Primary, GOP:WTA; Dems:WTA-CD3330
315DelawareClosed Primary, GOP:WTA; Dems:WTA-CD1013
3933GeorgiaSemi-open primary5747
No GOP raceNo GOP raceIdahoClosed caucus (Dem. Only)1211
5713IllinoisSemi-open primary10085
No GOP raceNo GOP raceKansasClosed caucus (Dem. Only)2119
3013MassachusettsSemi-open primary6160
2417MinnesotaOpen caucus4741
2731MissouriOpen primary, GOP:WTA; Dems:WTA-CD4741
322MontanaClosed caucus (GOP only), WTANo Dem. RaceNo Dem. Race
3913New JerseySemi-open primary, GOP:WTA; Dems:WTA-CD7057
No GOP raceNo GOP raceNew MexicoClosed caucus (Dem. Only)1724
8714New YorkClosed primary, GOP:WTA; Dems:WTA-CD151129
323North DakotaClosed caucus, GOP:WTA; Dems:WTA-CD813
1526OklahomaClosed Primary2522
2728TennesseeOpen primary4441
927UtahSemi-open primary, GOP:WTA; Dems:WTA-CD1514
921West VirginiaSemi-open caucus (GOP only)No Dem. RaceNo Dem. Race
627454Total for Super Tuesday1096995
Source: Numerous sources, and we know it's not all perfect!


Mitt Romney wins Maine GOP caucus: Feb. 2, 2008

Click for Mitt Romney's issue stances

The table below shows the number of delegates resulting from the Maine Republican caucus.

  • The middle column is an estimated number of delegates elected via the Maine caucus.
  • The right-hand column is the running total, including Maine, of the number of elected delegates plus committed Superdelegates.
  • The total number of RNC convention delegates needed to secure the Republican nomination is 1,245 (out of an estimated total of 2,488 delegates to the RNC Convention)
  • The Maine caucus is "winner-take-all", i.e., the winner of the popular vote gets all the delegates (not in proportion like other caucuses).

    Candidates ranked by    
    Maine popular vote    
    Maine.    
    delegates    
    Total committed    
    delegates, with Maine    
    Romney 18 88
    McCain 0 95
    Paul 0 6
    Huckabee 0 29
    Source: Delegate estimates from numerous news services.


    Ralph Nader forms Exploratory Committee: Feb. 1, 2008

    Would be 5th bid for the White House

    His name alone is enough to send even the most mild-mannered Democrats into paroxysms of rage, still smarting from their defeat in 2000 when George W. Bush won the election by beating Al Gore in Florida by just 537 votes. Standing as a Green party candidate, Nader took some 97,000 votes in the Sunshine State, triggering outrage among Democrats who believed he had siphoned off ballots from Gore.

    Vote "raider" and "spoiler" were some of the more printable names hurled at Nader by his critics. "Political bigot," shot back Nader this week, as he launched a presidential exploratory committee to see if he can attract enough support and funds to launch his fifth bid for the White House as an independent. "They scapegoated me," Nader told AFP in an interview. "They are congenitally unable of avoiding the scapegoat tag. Instead they should look in the mirror and ask why they lost."

    "One of our priorities is civil liberties and the candidates' right to get on the ballot," Nader said. "When 98 percent of people voted for the president in the Soviet Union, whose name was the only one on the ballot, everybody laughed. But in 90 percent of votes for the House of Representatives there is essentially only one candidate."

    Source: AFP News Service
    Click for complete Ralph Nader issue stances.


    Democratic debate before Super Tuesday: Jan. 31, 2008

    Hillary vs. Obama, first one-on-one

    Health Care
       Barack Obama: Against enforcement mechanism for mandating insurance.
       Hillary Clinton: Taxpayers pay for drug R&D, not drug companies.
       Hillary Clinton: Mandate insurance AND make it affordable for all.
    Principles & Values
       Hillary Clinton: The next president faces a stack of problems on day one.
    Tax Reform
       Barack Obama: I'm not bashful about it: wealthy will pay more taxes.
       Hillary Clinton: Wealthy should go back to paying pre-Bush tax rates.

    Source: Excerpts from Super Tuesday Democratic debate
    Click for complete debate coverage.


    Republican debate in California: Jan. 30, 2008

    Last Republican debate before Super Tuesday

    Budget & Economy
       John McCain: Things are tough now, but we're better off than in 2000.
       Mike Huckabee: We're worse off than in 2000, due to Congress' over-spending.
       Ron Paul: We're worse off than in 2000, due to Bush & Congress.
    Tax Reform
       Mitt Romney: Raised service fees like highway ads, from $200 to $2,000.
    War & Peace
       John McCain: Don't let enemy lay in the weeds until we leave.
       Mitt Romney: Never, ever supported specific timetable for exit from Iraq.

    Source: Excerpts from Super Tuesday Republican debate
    Click for complete debate coverage.


  • Rudy Giuliani withdraws from presidential race: Jan. 30, 2008

    Endorses John McCain

    The former New York mayor exited the race Wednesday and endorsed longtime friend John McCain, calling him an "American hero" and the candidate most qualified to be the next commander in chief.

    Giuliani's unconventional strategy of largely bypassing the early voting states and focusing on more populous, delegate-rich states produced just one delegate, a bunch of sixth-place finishes and made him the odd man out.

    His best showing was Florida, where he had staked his candidacy. He finished a distant third.

    It was a remarkable defeat for the ex-mayor who entered the race more than a year ago with an aura of invincibility, leading national polls and earning a reputation for toughness after his stewardship of New York as terrorists struck Sept. 11, 2001.

    This election year, the nation's economic woes replaced terrorism as a top issue for voters, and with that change, much of the rationale for Giuliani's candidacy disappeared. When voting began earlier this month, Republicans and independents flocked to his rivals, the conservative McCain, businessman Mitt Romney and the ordained Baptist minister Mike Huckabee.

    Source: Associated Press
    Click for complete records of John McCain's issue stances, or Rudy Giuliani's issue stances.


    John Edwards withdraws from presidential race: Jan. 30, 2008

    Exits race after placing 3rd in Florida primary

    It's time for me to step aside so that history can blaze its path. We do not know who will take the final steps to the White House -- but what we do know is that our Democratic Party will make history.

    And, along the way, all of you who have been involved in this campaign and this movement for change and this cause, I am asking you to continue speaking out for those who have no voice, just as Elizabeth and I will continue to do. We need you.

    Do not turn away from the great struggles before us. Do not give up on the causes that we have fought for. Do not walk away from what's possible, because it's time for all of us -- all of us together -- to make the two Americas one. We need you.

    Source: Campaign email from JohnEdwards.com
    Click for complete records of John Edwards's issue stances.


    John McCain wins Florida GOP primary: Jan. 29, 2008

    Click for John McCain's issue stances

    The table below shows the number of delegates resulting from the Florida Republican primary.

  • The middle column is an estimated number of delegates elected via the Florida primary.
  • The right-hand column is the running total, including Florida , of the number of elected delegates plus committed Superdelegates.
  • The total number of RNC convention delegates needed to secure the Republican nomination is 1,245 (out of an estimated total of 2,488 delegates to the RNC Convention)
  • The number of Florida delegates was cut in half (original total 114) because Florida moved its primary before the earlist allowed date of Feb. 5th.
  • Also note that the Florida primary is "winner-take-all", i.e., the winner of the popular vote gets all the delegates (not in proportion like other primaries)

    Candidates ranked by    
    Fla. popular vote    
    Fla.    
    delegates    
    Total committed    
    delegates, with Fla.    
    McCain 57 95
    Romney 0 70
    Giuliani 0 1
    Huckabee 0 29
    Paul 0 6
    Thompson 0 8
    Hunter 0 0
    Source: Delegate estimates from numerous news services.


    Hillary Clinton "wins" Florida Democratic primary: Jan. 29, 2008

    Click for Hillary Clinton's issue stances

    The table below shows the number of delegates resulting from the Florida Democratic primary.

    Candidates ranked by    
    Florida popular vote    
    Florida    
    Delegates    
    Committed DNC    
    delegates, with Fla.    
    Clinton 105309
    Obama 70182
    Edwards 33 86
    Kucinich 2 3
    Gravel 0 0
    Source: Delegate estimates from numerous news services.


    Ted Kennedy (D, MA) endorses Barack Obama: Jan. 28, 2008

    Click for Barack Obama's issue stances

    Source: Three newspapers cited above.
    Click for complete records of Ted Kennedy's or Barack Obama's issue stances.


    Barack Obama wins South Carolina Democratic primary: Jan. 26, 2008

    Click for Barack Obama's issue stances

    The table below shows the number of delegates resulting from the South Carolina Democratic primary.

    Candidates ranked by    
    S.C. popular vote    
    S.C.    
    Delegates    
    Committed DNC    
    delegates, with S.C.    
    Obama 25112
    Clinton 12204
    Edwards 8 61
    Gravel 0 0
    Source: Delegate estimates from numerous news services.


    Republican debate in Florida: Jan. 10, 2008

    Last Republican debate before Florida primary

    Budget & Economy
       John McCain: I'm well-versed in economics; I was at the Reagan Revolution.
       Mike Huckabee: Stimulus plan is $150B from China, to spend on Chinese goods.
       Ron Paul: Economic stimulus ok, but not via spending & printing money.
       Ron Paul: Dollar crashing due to trillions spent on maintaining empire.
    Corporations
       John McCain: Cut corporate income taxes to keep jobs here.
       Mitt Romney: Key to economic stimulus: get companies to buy more stuff.
    Tax Reform
       Rudy Giuliani: Reduce the capital gains tax, permanently.
    Technology
       Mike Huckabee: $150B for highway infrastructure is better stimulus package.

    Source: Excerpts from Florida Republican debate
    Click for complete debate coverage.


    Dennis Kucinich withdraws from presidential race: Jan. 24, 2008

    Focusing on contested primary for his House seat

    Representative Dennis J. Kucinich has decided to end his long-shot presidential bid, thinning the Democratic field, and allowing him to focus on a contested race for re-election in his Ohio Congressional district. In an interview with The Cleveland Plain Dealer, Mr. Kucinich said Thursday that he would announce that he was “transitioning out of the presidential campaign.”

    Mr. Kucinich, who campaigned on a strong antiwar message, was never able to gain much traction in the polls. He was excluded from the recent Democratic debates in New Hampshire, Nevada and South Carolina as networks tightened the rules for participation. The televised debates had been the main venue for getting out his campaign’s message. Mr. Kucinich, a former mayor of Cleveland and a six-term congressman, has a tough primary fight on his hands in Ohio’s 10th Congressional District. Four other Democrats are trying to defeat him on March 4.

    During the presidential campaign, Mr. Kucinich often noted that he was the only Democrat who had voted against authorizing the Iraq war. In Congress he led a drive to impeach Vice President Dick Cheney, and this week, promised to do the same against President Bush. Mr. Kucinich ran unsuccessfully for the Democratic presidential nomination in 2004. He told The Plain Dealer on Thursday that he would not endorse another Democrat in the presidential primary.

    Source: Michael Falcone, New York Times.
    Click for complete records of Dennis Kucinich's issue stances.


    Duncan Hunter endorses Mike Huckabee: Jan. 23, 2008

    Says Huckabee is "strongly committed" to Hunter's values

    Former Arkansas Governor and Republican Presidential Candidate Mike Huckabee accepted the endorsement of Congressman Duncan Hunter, the former Chairman of the House Armed Services Committee who withdrew from the Presidential race earlier this week.

    "I got to know Governor Huckabee well on the campaign trail. Of the remaining candidates, I feel that he is strongly committed to strengthening national defense, constructing the border fence and meeting the challenge of China's emergence as a military superpower that is taking large portions of America's industrial base," said Congressman Hunter.

    Hunter continued, "Mike Huckabee is a man of outstanding character and integrity. I saw that character over the last year of campaigning and was greatly impressed. The other Republican candidates have many strengths and I wish them all well. My personal choice is Mike Huckabee."

    Huckabee called on Hunter's supporters as well as those of former Senator Fred Thompson who also withdrew from the race, to join his campaign. "As a true authentic conservative, I have a vision to bring hope, opportunity and prosperity to all Americans, and I welcome their support,"Huckabee said.

    Source: Joint press release from Hunter and Huckabee campaigns
    Click for complete records of Mike Huckabee's issue stances or Duncan Hunter's issue stances.


    Fred Thompson (R, TN) withdraws from presidential race: Jan. 22, 2008

    No endorsement of any other candidate

    Fred Thompson, the actor and former senator with the long drawl and laconic manner, has dropped out of the Republican presidential race and ended what was a very strange campaign.

    The 65-year-old Thompson began the campaign with name recognition, the anointment in some party circles as the heir to Ronald Reagan, and almost unfettered access to conservative media in this country to get his message out. But it is widely agreed that he took too long before actually jumping into the race and squandered the early buzz his potential bid had created.

    He finished a poor third in the South Carolina primary on Saturday, and on Tuesday announced, "Today I have withdrawn my candidacy for president of the United States. I hope that my country and my party have benefited from our having made this effort."

    His campaign said Thompson would not endorse any of the other Republican candidates in a fevered race in Florida,where votes will be cast next Tuesday. He is a longtime ally of Arizona senator John McCain, but in the short term, evangelicals who gravitated to him in the south may return to the campaign of former Arkansas governor Mike Huckabee next Tuesday.

    Source: Tim Harper, The Toronto Star
    Click for complete records of Fred Thompson's issue stances.


    Congressional Black Caucus Institute's Democratic debate: Jan. 21, 2008

    Last Democratic debate before South Carolina primary

    Budget & Economy
       John Edwards: Stimulus package: focus on long-term investments.
    Energy & Oil
       Hillary Clinton: $650 for help with energy bills to those who can't afford it.
    Environment
       Hillary Clinton: $5B for green-collar jobs in economic stimulus package.
    Free Trade
       Barack Obama: Enforce environmental & labor provisions in trade agreements.
    Tax Reform
       Barack Obama: Stimulus package: $500 tax cut, & Social Security supplement.

    Source: Excerpts from CBC Democratic debate
    Click for complete debate coverage.


    Duncan Hunter (R, CA) withdraws from presidential race: Jan. 20, 2008

    Cites "failure to gain traction" after Nevada caucus

    We started this campaign a year ago right here, in San Diego Harbor, against the backdrop of American Naval power. We launched a campaign emphasizing a strong national defense, enforceable borders and restoring the industrial base of America.

    Today we end this campaign. The Nevada caucuses reflecting only 2% of the vote for me. I ran the campaign exactly the way I wanted to, and at this point not being able to gain traction in conservative states of Nevada and South Carolina, it's time to allow our volunteers and supporters to focus on the campaigns that remain viable.

    It's time for me to gear up for 2008's defense bill that will be put together over the coming weeks. There is work to be done in the areas of troop protection and new capabilities to be deployed in Iraq and Afghanistan. And over the horizon, the emergence of Communist China as a military super power will require a new emphasis on U.S. capabilities in undersea warfare, space, and long range air-power.

    The best way to maintain a new era of peace is for the U.S. to remain strong. Over the coming year I will endeavor to help craft a defense bill that meets the new security challenges.

    The failure of our campaign to gain traction is mine and mine alone. But we have driven the issues of national security, the border fence, the emergence of China and the need to reverse bad trade policy. Because of that, this campaign has been very worthwhile, and for the Hunter family, a lot of fun.

    Source: Statement on campaign website, www.gohunter08.com
    Click for complete records of Duncan Hunter's issue stances.


    Hillary Clinton wins Nevada Democratic caucus: Jan. 19, 2008

    Click for Hillary Clinton's issue stances

    The table below shows the number of delegates resulting from the Nevada Democratic caucuses.

    Candidates ranked by    
    Nevada popular vote    
    Nevada    
    Delegates    
    Committed DNC    
    delegates, with NV    
    Clinton 14192
    Obama 14 87
    Edwards 0 53
    Kucinich 0 1
    Gravel 0 0
    Source: Delegate estimates from numerous news services.


    John McCain wins South Carolina GOP primary: Jan. 19, 2008

    Click for John McCain's issue stances

    The table below shows the number of delegates resulting from the South Carolina Republican primary.

    Candidates ranked by    
    S.C. popular vote    
    S.C.    
    delegates    
    Total committed    
    delegates, with S.C.    
    McCain 19 38
    Huckabee 5 29
    Thompson 0 8
    Romney 0 70
    Paul 0 6
    Giuliani 0 1
    Hunter 0 0
    Source: Delegate estimates from numerous news services.


    Mitt Romney wins Nevada GOP caucus: Jan. 19, 2008

    Click for Mitt Romney's issue stances

    The table below shows the number of delegates resulting from the Nevada Republican caucuses.

  • The middle column is an estimated number of delegates elected via the Nevada caucuses.
  • The right-hand column is the running total, including Nevada, of the number of elected delegates plus committed Superdelegates.
  • The total number of RNC convention delegates needed to secure the Republican nomination is 1,245 (out of an estimated total of 2,488 delegates to the RNC Convention)
    Candidates ranked by    
    Nevada popular vote    
    Nevada    
    delegates    
    Total committed    
    delegates, with NV    
    Romney 18 70
    McCain 4 19
    Paul 4 6
    Huckabee 2 24
    Thompson 2 8
    Giuliani 1 1
    Hunter 0 0
    Source: Delegate estimates from numerous news services.


    Hillary Clinton "wins" Michigan Democratic primary: Jan. 15, 2008

    Click for Hillary Clinton's issue stances

    The table below shows the number of delegates resulting from the Michigan Democratic primary.

    Candidates ranked by    
    Michigan popular vote    
    Michigan    
    Delegates    
    Committed DNC    
    delegates, with MI    
    Clinton 86 264
    Uncommitted (62)  
    Obama 31 104
    Edwards 31 84
    Kucinich 6 7
    Gravel 1 1
    Source: Delegate estimates from numerous news services.


    Mitt Romney wins Michigan GOP primary: Jan. 15, 2008

    Click for Mitt Romney's issue stances

    The table below shows the number of delegates resulting from the Michigan Republican primary.

  • The middle column is an estimated number of delegates elected via the Michigan primary.
  • The number of Michigan delegates was reduced from 60 to 30 because Michigan broke the party rules by moving its primary so early.
  • The right-hand column is the running total, including Michigan, of the number of elected delegates plus committed Superdelegates.
  • The total number of RNC convention delegates needed to secure the Republican nomination is 1,245 (out of an estimated total of 2,488 delegates to the RNC Convention)
    Candidates ranked by    
    Michigan popular vote    
    Michigan    
    delegates    
    Total committed    
    delegates, with MI    
    Romney 22 52
    McCain 5 15
    Huckabee 1 22
    Paul 0 2
    Thompson 0 6
    Giuliani 0 1
    Hunter 0 0
    Source: Delegate estimates from numerous news services.


    NYC Mike Bloomberg lays groundwork for Presidential run: Jan. 13, 2008

    No timing on decision

    Without clear frontrunners in the US primaries, pressure is mounting on New York mayor Mike Bloomberg to make a decision on launching an independent bid for the presidency. He has talked with potential running mates; he has criticised candidates on policy; he has been flattered and encouraged by cover stories in Time and Newsweek; and he has paid for polling in every state to gauge potential support.

    But officially, at least, the self-made multi-billionaire is sticking to his coy position: denying interest in a possible White House bid while his political team continues to lay the groundwork and infrastructure for one. His denials are as categorical as his preparations are thorough. But with high expectations that campaigning will now turn bitter and partisan, Bloomberg is running short of time. Calls for a decision are mounting but the excitement is not matched by pollsters detecting a groundswell of support, and the luxury of offering his opinions and winning attention without the risk of counterattack is wearing thin.

    Bloomberg's political calculation depends on being able to run down the centre of the political field - and right now the field is in flux. A Barack Obama nomination gives Bloomberg less room to run than a Hillary Clinton candidacy; a John McCain win makes less room for him, than if Mike Huckabee, Mitt Romney or Rudy Giuliani were chosen. The other crucial factor is the direction of the US economy. If, as many predict, the US is heading for a severe recession, Bloomberg can present himself as an economic pragmatist and deal-maker with a record of founding and running a highly successful business, Bloomberg LP, and who, as mayor, has balanced the city's books.

    Critics of Bloomberg's quasi-candidacy say the country needs a leader not a manager. He counters by roundly accusing declared candidates of failing to offer adequate leadership and shying away from substantive issues. 'They're unwilling to face the big issues, take the risks and give it straight to the public,' he said last week. 'And that's not good for democracy and it's certainly not good for America.'

    But Bloomberg has noticeably avoided criticism of Barack Obama, with whom he shared a much-publicised power breakfast in Manhattan in December, leading to speculation that if Obama wins the nomination - denying Bloomberg room to run as a centrist - he may offer Bloomberg the position of his running mate.

    Source: The Guardian Observer (London, UK)
    Click for complete Michael Bloomberg issue stances.


    John Kerry endorses Barack Obama: Jan. 12, 2008

    "Obama can help our country turn the page "

    Sen. John Kerry of Massachusetts, the 2004 Democratic presidential nominee, endorsed Sen. Barack Obama for the White House Thursday in a timely slap at Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton as well as his own vice presidential running mate. Kerry delivered his endorsement in South Carolina at a time, two weeks before that state's primary, when Clinton is riding a wave of enthusiasm following her victory over Obama in the New Hampshire primary.

    Kerry said there were other candidates in the race whom he also had worked with and respected. "But I believe more than anyone else, Barack Obama can help our country turn the page and get America moving by uniting and ending the division we have faced," Kerry said. "We are electing judgment and character, not years on this earth," said Kerry, who added that Obama, an opponent of the Iraq war, was "right about the war in Iraq from the beginning."

    Former Sen. John Edwards of North Carolina, the third contender in the Democratic presidential race, was Kerry's vice presidential running mate in 2004. Despite their political alliance, the two men were not close personally and differed behind the scenes on campaign strategy in a race that President Bush won.

    Source: CBS News
    Click for complete set of John Kerry's or Barack Obama's issue stances.


    Bill Richardson withdraws: Jan. 11, 2008

    Withdraws after poor showing in NH Primary

    It is with great pride, understanding and acceptance that I am ending my campaign for President of the United States.

    We made our case for change -- guided by an experienced hand. We made our case for a foreign policy of principle and realism. Of rebuilding alliances through diplomacy and unflagging support for democracy. We made our case for rebuilding this country with a laser like focus on economic growth, creating quality jobs like we've done in New Mexico, investing in education, science, math and the arts and providing universal health care. And we made our case for bringing people together -- as I have done for my entire career-Democrats, Independents, Republicans -- to break the gridlock in Washington and get things done for the American people.

    Now, all of the remaining candidates are coming to our point of view. I am confident that the next President of the United States will implement much of what we've been urging for the last twelve months, and our nation and world will be the better for it.

    Source: Campaign website, www.richardsonforpresident.com
    Click for complete set of Bill Richardson's issue stances.


    Fox News S.C. Republican debate: Jan. 10, 2008

    Last Republican debate before Michigan & South Carolina primaries

    Budget & Economy
       Fred Thompson: Consider stimulus package targeted to low-income people.
       John McCain: To avoid recession, stop out-of-control spending.
       Mike Huckabee: Fuel prices & subprime mortgages possibly cause recession.
       Mitt Romney: To avoid recession, deal with housing crisis & gas prices.
       Ron Paul: Lower interest rates CAUSED housing bubble & can't solve it.
       Ron Paul: The longer the Fed delays recession, the worse the recession.
    Government Reform
       John McCain: I'm "the sheriff", not Miss Congeniality, about pork bills.
    Jobs
       John McCain: Straight talk: some jobs aren't coming back.
       Mitt Romney: MA had 3rd worst job growth; I turned around declining rates.
    Tax Reform
       Fred Thompson: Tax cuts raise revenues; so much for the experts.
       Ron Paul: Spending money doesn't stimulate economy; reduced taxes do.
       Rudy Giuliani: Cutting anti-competitive taxes raises more revenue.

    Source: Excerpts from Fox News South Carolina Republican debate
    Click for complete debate coverage.


    Hillary Clinton wins New Hampshire Democratic primary: Jan. 8, 2008

    Click for Hillary Clinton's issue stances

    The table below shows the number of delegates resulting from the New Hampshire Democratic primary.

    Candidates ranked by    
    N.H. popular vote    
    N.H.    
    Delegates    
    Committed DNC    
    delegates, with N.H.    
    Clinton 9 178
    Obama 9 73
    Edwards 4 53
    Richardson 0 19
    Kucinich 0 1
    Biden 0 7
    Gravel 0 0
    Dodd 0 4
    Source: Delegate estimates from numerous news services.


    John McCain wins New Hampshire GOP primary: Jan. 8, 2008

    Click for John McCain's issue stances

    The table below shows the number of delegates resulting from the New Hampshire Republican primary.

  • The middle column is an estimated number of delegates elected via the New Hampshire primary.
  • The right-hand column is the running total, including New Hampshire, of the number of elected delegates plus committed Superdelegates.
  • The total number of RNC convention delegates needed to secure the Republican nomination is 1,245 (out of an estimated total of 2,488 delegates to the RNC Convention)
    Candidates ranked by    
    N.H. popular vote    
    N.H.    
    delegates    
    Total committed    
    delegates, with N.H.    
    McCain 7 10
    Romney 4 30
    Huckabee 1 21
    Giuliani 0 1
    Paul 0 2
    Thompson 0 6
    Hunter 0 0
    Source: Delegate estimates from numerous news services.


    Fox News Republican debate: Jan. 6, 2008

    Last Republican debate before New Hampshire primary

    Foreign Policy
       Fred Thompson: Keep Guantanamo open; keep embargo on Cuba.
       Mike Huckabee: As governor, visited 41 countries & met with heads of state.
       Rudy Giuliani: Foreign experience as mayor, at justice Dept., & in 91 trips.
    Homeland Security
       Fred Thompson: Habeas corpus does not apply at Guantanamo; so keep it open.
       Mike Huckabee: Keeping Guantanamo prisoners more important than location.
    Social Security
       Fred Thompson: Allow individual retirement accounts with government match.
    Tax Reform
       John McCain: Supported Reagan tax cuts because matched by spending cuts.
       Mike Huckabee: Raised AR net tax burden by $500M to comply with court order.
       Mitt Romney: Lowering taxes, like Bush tax cuts, grows the economy.
       Rudy Giuliani: I am a supply-sider; and I actually made it work.

    Source: Excerpts from Fox News Republican debate
    Click for complete debate coverage.


    Facebook Democratic debate: Jan. 5, 2008

    Last Democratic debate before New Hampshire primary

    Foreign Policy
       Bill Richardson: Ask Musharraf to step aside as Pakistan's ruler.
    Homeland Security
       Barack Obama: Rebuild a nuclear nonproliferation strategy.
       Barack Obama: Going after Al Qaeda in Pakistan is not Bush-style invasion.
       John Edwards: Ad-hoc proliferation policy does not work over the long-term.
    War & Peace
       Barack Obama: Al Qaida is based in northwest Pakistan; strike if needed.
       Bill Richardson: Get bin Laden in Pakistan unilaterally, if Pakistan can't.
       Hillary Clinton: Ok to target Al Qaeda in Pakistan; we did that 10 years ago.
       John Edwards: Get bin Laden, period, even if in Pakistan.

    Source: Excerpts from Facebook Democratic debate
    Click for complete debate coverage.


    Facebook Republican debate: Jan. 5, 2008

    "One day, two debates"

    Foreign Policy
       Ron Paul: No nation-building; no world policeman; no pre-emptive war.
    Homeland Security
       Fred Thompson: Pre-emptive war has got to be an option.
       John McCain: I support the Bush doctrine of pre-emptive war.
       Mike Huckabee: Islamic terror is about worldwide caliphate, not US attacks.
       Mitt Romney: Jihadists attack to destroy all moderate governments.
       Ron Paul: Jihadists attack because we have bases in their countries.
       Rudy Giuliani: Islamic terror is existential threat, not based on US policy.
       Mitt Romney: We need at least 100,000 more troops in our military.
       Ron Paul: We'd be as furious as Muslims are, if our land was occupied.
      
    War & Peace
       Mitt Romney: You attack US and we respond; but use nonmilitary too.
       Mitt Romney: Supported the surge; never supported a timed withdrawal.

    Source: Excerpts from Facebook Republican debate
    Click for complete debate coverage.


    Mitt Romney wins Wyoming GOP caucus: Jan. 5, 2008

    Click for Mitt Romney's issue stances

    The table below shows the number of delegates resulting from the Wyoming Republican caucuses (there were no Democratic caucuses in Wyoming on Jan. 5).

  • The middle numeric column is an estimated number of delegates elected via the Wyoming caucuses. The actual number will be determined at an Iowa state convention for that purpose.
  • The right-hand column is the running total, including Wyoming, of the number of elected delegates plus committed Superdelegates.
  • The total number of RNC convention delegates needed to secure the Republican nomination is 1,245 (out of an estimated total of 2,488 delegates to the RNC Convention)
    Candidates ranked by    
    Wyoming popular vote    
    Wyoming    
    delegates    
    Total committed    
    delegates, with WY    
    Romney 8 26
    Thompson 3 6
    Hunter 1 1
    Huckabee 0 20
    McCain 0 3
    Paul 0 2
    Giuliani 0 1
    Source: Delegate estimates from numerous news services.


    Chris Dodd withdraws: Jan. 4, 2008

    Withdraws after poor showing in Iowa caucus

    Democrat Chris Dodd, who moved his entire family to Iowa for the last weeks of the campaign, dropped out tonight after his poor showing in the caucuses.

    The Connecticut senator had hoped to finish at least fourth, but was seventh with almost all precincts reporting.

    He played up his experience in the US Senate and strongly criticized the Bush administration over what he called an assault on civil liberties during the war on terror, but his campaign never caught fire, overshadowed by the better-financed campaigns of Barack Obama and Hillary Clinton in particular.

    Source: By Foon Rhee, Boston Globe
    Click for complete set of Chris Dodd's issue stances.


    Joe Biden withdraws: Jan. 4, 2008

    "I feel no regret"

    Sen. Joseph Biden Jr. (Del.) abandoned his candidacy after poor showings in last night's Iowa caucuses. Biden, who was elected to the Senate in 1972 and serves as chairman of the Foreign Relations Committee, had hoped large crowds in recent weeks would help him earn at least a fourth-place showing. But that support did not materialize, and Biden netted only about 1 percent of delegates, less than half what recent polls had predicted.

    "There is nothing sad about tonight. We are so incredibly proud of you all," Biden said to supporters. "So many of you have sacrificed for me, and I am so indebted to you. I feel no regret."

    Biden blitzed the state, scooping up endorsements from state and local officials, and offering crowds intricate discourses on foreign policy. But in a year in which voters said they were seeking change, Biden struck Iowans as a little too familiar, a fixture of a Washington establishment that had grown stale from years of gridlock and partisan infighting.

    Source: Shailagh Murray, Washington Post, Page A12
    Click for complete set of Joe Biden's issue stances.


    Mike Huckabee wins Iowa GOP caucus: Jan. 3, 2008

    Click for Mike Huckabee's issue stances

    The table below shows the number of delegates resulting from the Iowa Republican caucuses.

  • The first numeric column is an estimated number of delegates elected via the Iowa caucuses. The actual number will be determined at an Iowa state convention for that purpose.
  • The right-hand column is the running total, including Iowa, of the number of elected delegates plus committed Superdelegates.
  • The total number of RNC convention delegates needed to secure the Republican nomination is 1,245 (out of an estimated total of 2,488 delegates to the RNC Convention)
    Candidates ranked by    
    Iowa popular vote    
    Iowa    
    delegates    
    Superdelegates    
    prior to Iowa    
    Total committed    
    delegates    
    Huckabee 173 20
    Romney 126 18
    Thompson 30 3
    McCain 30 3
    Paul 20 2
    Giuliani 01 1
    Hunter 00 0
    Source: Delegate estimates from numerous news services.


    Barack Obama wins Iowa Democratic caucus: Jan. 3, 2008

    Click for Barack Obama's issue stances

    The table below shows the number of delegates resulting from the Iowa Democratic caucuses.

    Candidates ranked by    
    Iowa popular vote    
    Iowa    
    Delegates    
    Iowa    
    Superdelegates    
    Committed DNC    
    Superdelegates    
    Obama 16 2 64
    Edwards 15 2 49
    Clinton 14 2 169
    Richardson 0 0 19
    Dodd 0 0 4
    Biden 0 0 7
    Kucinich 0 0 1
    Gravel 0 0 0
    Source: Delegate estimates from numerous news services.


    Democratic Delegate counting begins: Jan. 1, 2008

    2,025 delegates needed to win nomination at the Democratic National Convention

    Today OnTheIssues.org begins our 2008 Democratic caucus and primary coverage. We report only one thing: the number of delegates to the Democratic National Convention.

    We report only that number because no other number matters at all -- who's "ahead" in the polls does not matter; who wins the popular vote in any particular caucus or primary does not matter; who has "momentum" does not matter; in fact, just about everything that the mainstream media pundits chatter about doesn't matter. If you want to be a sophisticated political analyst, then ignore the pundits, and focus on what the campaign managers focus on: All that matters is: Who gets the majority of delegates at the Democratic National Convention?

    As with the Electoral College, we do not vote directly for a primary candidate. Our vote in our state's caucuses and primaries actually elect "delegates" to attend the DNC Convention, scheduled for Aug. 25th-28th, 2008, in Denver. Those delegates actually decide who will be the Democratic nominee.

    The DNC Convention will have approximately 4,049 delegates in attendance. Therefore, the "magic number" to win the nomination is 2,025 (half the delegates plus one). The primaries effectively end when one candidate achieves the "magic number" of committed delegates. We report estimates of the delegate count because it's unknown how many delegates will actually show up (they must be present to vote; there are "alternates" elected if the elected delegate cannot attend).

    In addition to delegates elected at caucuses and primaries, also eligible to vote are "PLEO delegates" (Party leaders and elected officials), commonly referred to as "Superdelegates." They comprise members of the Democratic National Committee and other elected officials. They typically "pledge" to one candidate or another, but are free to vote for whomever they choose at the Convention. There are no "alternates" for PLEO delegates, which is why the number of delegates is only approximate. Some PLEO Delegates are already committed -- that is the starting point for our delegate count....

    Candidates ranked by    
    DNC superdelegates    
    Committed DNC    
    Super-delegates    
    Clinton 153
    Obama 46
    Edwards 32
    Richardson 19
    Biden 7
    Dodd 4
    Kucinich 1
    Gravel 0
    Source: Delegate estimates from numerous news services.


    Republican Delegate counting begins: Jan. 1, 2008

    1,245 delegates needed to win nomination at the Republican National Convention

    Today OnTheIssues.org begins our 2008 Republican caucus and primary coverage. We report only one thing: the number of delegates to the Republican National Convention.

    We report only that number because no other number matters at all -- who's "ahead" in the polls does not matter; who wins the popular vote in any particular caucus or primary does not matter; who has "momentum" does not matter; in fact, just about everything that the mainstream media pundits chatter about doesn't matter. If you want to be a sophisticated political analyst, then ignore the pundits, and focus on what the campaign managers focus on: All that matters is: Who gets the majority of delegates at the Republican National Convention?

    As with the Electoral College, we do not vote directly for a primary candidate. Our vote in our state's caucuses and primaries actually elect "delegates" to attend the RNC Convention, scheduled for Sept. 1st-4th, 2008, in Minneapolis-St. Paul. Those delegates actually decide who will be the Republican nominee.

    The RNC Convention will have approximately 2,488 delegates in attendance. Therefore, the "magic number" to win the nomination is 1,245 (half the delegates plus one). The primaries effectively end when one candidate achieves the "magic number" of committed delegates. We report estimates of the delegate count because it's unknown how many delegates will actually show up (they must be present to vote; there are "alternates" elected if the elected delegate cannot attend).

    In addition to delegates elected at caucuses and primaries, also eligible to vote are "PLEO delegates" (Party leaders and elected officials), commonly referred to as "Superdelegates." They comprise members of the Republican National Committee and other elected officials. They typically "pledge" to one candidate or another, but are free to vote for whomever they choose at the Convention. There are no "alternates" for PLEO delegates, which is why the number of delegates is only approximate. Some PLEO Delegates are already committed -- that is the starting point for our delegate count....

    Candidates ranked by    
    RNC superdelegates    
    Committed RNC    
    Super-delegates    
    Romney 6
    Huckabee 3
    Giuliani 1
    Hunter 0
    McCain 0
    Paul 0
    Thompson 0
    Source: Delegate estimates from numerous news services.

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