Search for...
OnTheIssuesLogo

Zell Miller on Principles & Values


For Bush because "my family is more important than my party"

Like you, I think of their future, the promises and the perils they will face. Like you, I believe that the next four years will determine what kind of world they will grow up in. And like you, I ask which leader is it today that [will] best protect my family? The clear answer to that question has placed me in this hall with you tonight. For my family is more important than my party. There is but one man to whom I am willing to entrust their future and that man's name is George Bush.
Source: 2004 Republican Convention Keynote speech Sep 1, 2004

We need bipartisanship in times of war

Where is bipartisanship in this country when we need it most? Now, while young Americans are dying [in wars], our nation is being torn apart and made weaker because of the Democrat's manic obsession to bring down our Commander in Chief. I can remember when Democrats believed that it was the duty of America to fight for freedom over tyranny. Time after time in our history, in the face of great danger, Democrats and Republicans worked together to ensure that freedom would not falter. But not today.
Source: 2004 Republican Convention Keynote speech Sep 1, 2004

Democratic party is value-neutral and misguided on issues

In the eyes of Middle America, the Democratic Party has become a value-neutral party. Everyone knows the key issues: capital punishment, late-term abortion, trying violent juveniles as adults, national defense, and the teaching of values in school l(though not necessarily prayer). As issues, these trump prescription drug costs and health care.
Source: A National Party No More, by Zell Miller, p. 3 Oct 1, 2003

The Democrats in power don't care about the South

Once upon a time, FDR, looked south and said, " I see one-third of a nation in poverty " Today our national Democratic leaders look south and say, " I see one-third of a Nation and it can go to hell. " Either the party is not a national party or the candidates were not national candidates.
Source: A National Party No More, by Zell Miller, p. 9-10 Oct 1, 2003

Democratic party leaders too liberal for the South

In the 2002 elections, not a single national leader could come to the South to campaign without doing more harm than good. They were strangers in a foreign land. National chairman Terry McAuliffe couldn't come. He was too liberal. Former President Bill Clinton couldn't come. He was too liberal. The party's titular head, Al Gore, couldn't come. He was too liberal. Senate majority leader Tom Daschle couldn't come. He was too liberal. So, if this is a National party, sushi is our national dish.
Source: A National Party No More, by Zell Miller, p. 10 Oct 1, 2003

Member of the Senate’s “Centrist Coalition”

Miller reaffirmed his commitment today to work in a bipartisan fashion for Georgians on improving education, cutting taxes & boosting agriculture. Miller, a member of the Senate’s new Centrist Coalition, said he is ready to reach across the aisle and build consensus to get things done in a Senate that is divided 50-50 between Republicans & Democrats. “I don’t believe this nation is deeply divided, but it is evenly divided. We will have to look for the middle ground on issues that come before us.”
Source: Press Release, “107th Congress” Jan 3, 2001

Member of Democratic Leadership Council.

Miller is a member of the Democratic Leadership Council:

Mission

The DLC’s mission is to promote public debate within the Democratic Party and the public at large about national and international policy and political issues. Specifically, as the founding organization of the New Democrat movement, the DLC’s goal is to modernize the progressive tradition in American politics for the 21st Century by advancing a set of innovative ideas for governing through a national network of elected officials and community leaders.

Who We Are

The Democratic Leadership Council is an idea center, catalyst, and national voice for a reform movement that is reshaping American politics by moving it beyond the old left-right debate. The DLC seeks to define and galvanize popular support for a new public philosophy built on progressive ideals, mainstream values, and innovative, non bureaucratic, market-based solutions. At its heart are three principles: promoting opportunity for all; demanding responsibility from everyone; and fostering a new sense of community.

Since its inception, the DLC has championed policies from spurring private sector economic growth, fiscal discipline and community policing to work based welfare reform, expanded international trade, and national service. Throughout the 90’s, innovative, New Democrat policies implemented by former DLC Chairman President Bill Clinton have helped produce the longest period of sustained economic growth in our history, the lowest unemployment in a generation, 22 million new jobs, cut the welfare rolls in half, reduced the crime rate for seven straight years, balanced the budget and streamlined the federal bureaucracy to its smallest size since the Kennedy administration.

Now, the DLC is promoting new ideas -- such as a second generation of environmental protection and new economy and technology development strategies -- that is distinctly different from traditional liberalism and conservatism to build the next generation of America’s leaders.

Source: Democratic Leadership Council web site 01-DLC0 on Nov 7, 2000

New Democrat: "Third Way" instead of left-right debate.

Miller adopted Third Way principles of the Democratic Leadership Council:

America and the world have changed dramatically in the closing decades of the 20th century. The industrial order of the 20th century is rapidly yielding to the networked “New Economy” of the 21st century. Our political and governing systems, however, have lagged behind the rest of society in adapting to these seismic shifts. They remain stuck in the left-right debates and the top-down bureaucracies of the industrial past.

The Democratic Leadership Council, and its affiliated think tank the Progressive Policy Institute, have been catalysts for modernizing politics and government. The core principles and ideas of this “Third Way” movement [began with] Bill Clinton’s Presidential campaign in 1992, Tony Blair’s Labour Party in Britain in 1997, and Gerhard Shroeder’s Social Democrats in Germany in 1998.

    The Third Way philosophy seeks to adapt enduring progressive values to the new challenges of he information age. It rests on three cornerstones:
  1. the idea that government should promote equal opportunity for all while granting special privilege for none;
  2. an ethic of mutual responsibility that equally rejects the politics of entitlement and the politics of social abandonment;
  3. and, a new approach to governing that empowers citizens to act for themselves.
The Third Way approach to economic opportunity and security stresses technological innovation, competitive enterprise, and education rather than top- down redistribution or laissez faire. On questions of values, it embraces “tolerant traditionalism,” honoring traditional moral and family values while resisting attempts to impose them on others. It favors an enabling rather than a bureaucratic government, expanding choices for citizens, using market means to achieve public ends and encouraging civic and community institutions to play a larger role in public life. The Third Way works to build inclusive, multiethnic societies based on common allegiance to democratic values.
Source: Democratic Leadership Council web site 01-DLC1 on Nov 7, 2000

Member of the Senate New Democrat Coalition.

Miller is a member of the Senate New Democrat Coalition:

The Senate New Democrat Coalition (SNDC) [is analogous to] the New Democrat Coalition (NDC) in the House. Members of both groups are moderate Democrats who advocate a new centrist, progressive approach to governing and who often reach across party lines to get things done.

Established in 1997, the House New Democrat Coalition (NDC) grew to 64 members between 1998 and 2000, making it the largest caucus in the House. With the success of NDN’s top House candidates on Election Day, the NDC has grown to 72 members in the 107th Congress. The Senate New Democrat Coalition (SNDC), established in 2000, is already 20 members.

In announcing the establishment of the SNDC in February 2000, Sen. Landrieu stated, “The American people are tired of the same old proposals and are demanding that we work together in a more creative way on the many problems facing our nation. Too often here in Washington, the loudest voices are the ones on the far left and far right. That is why this group was formed, to give voice to those in the sensible center.” The SNDC has already made its voice heard on critical issues ranging from education to trade to health care and, with the Senate evenly divided, the Senate New Dems are increasingly determining the balance of power.

Source: Senate New Democrat Coalition web site 01-SNDC0 on Jan 1, 2001

  • Click here for definitions & background information on Principles & Values.
  • Click here for policy papers on Principles & Values.
  • Click here for SenateMatch answers by Zell Miller.
  • Agree? Disagree? Voice your opinions on Principles & Values in The Forum.
Other candidates on Principles & Values: Zell Miller on other issues:
GA Gubernatorial:
Sonny Perdue
GA Senatorial:
Allen Buckley
Denise Majette
Johnny Isakson
Mac Collins
Mary Squires
Max Cleland
Paul Coverdell
Sam Nunn
Saxby Chambliss

Presidential:
George W. Bush
(Republican for President)
V.P.Dick Cheney
(Republican for V.P.)
Sen.John Kerry
(Democratic nominee for Pres.)
Sen.John Edwards
(Democratic nominee for V.P.)
Ralph Nader
(Reform nominee for Pres.)
Peter Camejo
(Reform nominee for V.P.)
David Cobb
(Green nominee for Pres.)
Michael Badnarik
(Libertarian nominee for Pres.)
Michael Peroutka
(Constitution nominee for Pres.)
2004 Senate Races:
(AK)Knowles v.Murkowski v.Sykes
(AR)Holt v.Lincoln
(AZ)McCain v.Starky
(CA)Boxer v.Jones v.Gray
(CO)Coors v.Salazar v.Randall v.Acosta
(CT)Dodd v.Orchulli
(FL)Castor v.Martinez
(GA)Isakson v.Majette v.Buckley
(IA)Grassley v.Small v.Northrop
(IL)Obama v.Keyes
(IN)Bayh v.Scott
(KY)Bunning v.Mongiardo
(LA)John v.Vitter v.Kennedy
(MD)Mikulski v.Pipkin
(MO)Bond v.Farmer
(NC)Bowles v.Burr
(ND)Dorgan v.Liffrig
(NH)Granny D v.Gregg
(NV)Reid v.Ziser
(NY)Schumer v.Mills v.McReynolds
(OH)Fingerhut v.Voinovich
(OK)Carson v.Coburn
(OR)Wyden v.King
(PA)Hoeffel v.Specter v.Summers
(SC)DeMint v.Tenenbaum
(SD)Daschle v.Thune
(UT)Bennett v.Van Dam
(VT)Leahy v.McMullen
(WA)Murray v.Nethercutt
(WI)Feingold v.Michels
Abortion
Budget/Economy
Civil Rights
Corporations
Crime
Drugs
Education
Energy/Oil
Environment
Families
Foreign Policy
Free Trade
Govt. Reform
Gun Control
Health Care
Homeland Security
Immigration
Jobs
Principles
Social Security
Tax Reform
Technology
War/Peace
Welfare

Other Senators
House of Representatives
SenateMatch (matching quiz)
HouseMatch
Senate Votes (analysis)
House Votes