State of Idaho Archives: on Budget & Economy


Michael Crapo: Eliminate unnecessary and wasteful government spending

I have co-sponsored the Balanced Budget Amendment every year I have been in Congress and have consistently fought to eliminate unnecessary and wasteful government spending. A robust private sector--not more government spending--creates real economic opportunity for families and small businesses. The current level of our national debt is unsustainable and unacceptable. I co-sponsored several bills that call for balancing the federal budget by moving to a biennial federal budget process.
Source: 2021 Idaho Senate campaign website CrapoForSenate.com Jun 16, 2021

Brad Little: $126 million for highways; $80 million for transportation

My plan invests $126 million in state and local highway infrastructure projects and makes targeted investments in safe routes to schools, rail infrastructure, and community airports. I am also proposing $80 million dollars in new ongoing transportation funding. A dependable transportation system is fundamental to commerce. In Idaho, we grow and process most of our commodities, and getting those products down the road in a timely fashion is critical.
Source: 2021 State of the State Address to the Idaho legislature Jan 11, 2021

Paulette Jordan: Invest in infrastructure while interest rates are low

Being fiscally conservative means cutting unnecessary spending and making the right investments at the right time to make things cost less for taxpayers. While interest rates are low, we need to invest in our infrastructure before it's too late and our roads and bridges collapse. It means working hard to balance the budget and finding ways to pay for priority projects with existing resources, not having to borrow the money down the road, which would make taxpayers foot a much higher bill.
Source: 2020 Idaho Senate campaign website PauletteForSenate.com Jun 29, 2020

Brad Little: Look for too much spending on autopilot

As we review our state budget-we must ask key questions: Is there too much spending on autopilot? Are we putting off maintenance that will cost our children more tomorrow? Do we have adequate rainy-day funds? How do we structure the surplus eliminator?

These measures and my proposed budget ensure we avoid the short-term fiscal mistakes that other states and the federal government continue to make.

Source: 2019 State of the State address to Idaho legislature Jan 7, 2019

Paulette Jordan: The way to a strong economy is investing in innovation

It's a simple fact that Idaho's economy is suffering. Local businesses struggle to keep doors open and many workers cannot provide for their families on a full-time salary. These economic realities hit our rural towns the hardest. As governor, I will revitalize our economy in every part of our state by investing in innovation and expanding opportunity, especially in rural areas.
Source: 2018 Idaho Governor campaign website JordanForGovernor.com May 15, 2018

Tommy Ahlquist: Balance budget, cut waste

Tommy understands the importance of a balanced budget and responsible spending. We can always count on him to cut waste, streamline government and spend our tax dollars wisely.
Source: 2018 Idaho Gubernatorial website TommyForIdaho.com Aug 8, 2017

Brad Little: Come out Great Recession with budget balanced

As a native Idahoan, 3rd generation rancher and businessman, Lt. Gov. Little knows more about Washington County than Washington DC. Brad and his wife have a deep respect for the traditions and values that help define us as Idahoans. Now Brad wants to work for you as Idaho's next Governor.

Idaho came out of the Great Recession with our budget balanced, our priorities straight and our people poised to lead the nation in job growth and economic opportunity. We've done well but we can do even better.

Source: 2018 Gubernatorial campaign website BradLittleForIdaho.com Jan 17, 2017

Jerry Sturgill: Profitability driven by productivity, not pinching pennies

The economy must work for all people, not just the rich and powerful. I have spent my career working to turn companies around and make them profitable. But profitability does not come from pinching pennies and limiting benefits. Profitability is driven by productivity. Workers are more productive when they aren't discouraged by poverty, when they are valued and respected, and when they believe that tomorrow can and will be better.

Many struggle to live and raise a family even when working full time. There is an astounding and unprecedented level of economic inequality today. The top .01% of people in our country control as much wealth as the bottom 80%. How can this be? How can we allow families to live at or below poverty levels when parents work 40 hours a week? The minimum wage simply must be a livable wage, at levels higher than present and appropriate to the cost of living in Idaho. Wage increases should be phased in, to protect our small businesses and not discourage our entrepreneurs.

Source: 2016 Idaho Senate campaign website Sturgill4Senate.com Aug 31, 2016

Nels Mitchell: No silly votes to shut down government; no budget blackmail

I said when I announced yesterday that I'll go back to Washington and work for Idaho. I won't be an automatic vote for anyone or anything, unlike Mr. Risch who shields his lack of accomplishment in the Senate by voting NO on virtually everything and by offering no real solutions of his own. In particular, he has done nothing to promote job growth in Idaho.

Unlike Mr. Risch, I won't cast silly votes to shutdown our government; I won't use budget blackmail to harm Mountain Home Air Force Base or the INL, and I won't concentrate on Syria and Kazakhstan at the expense of Kootenai or Canyon County.

This election is about the record of a life-long politician who has held elected office for nearly 40 years and, in an entire term in the U.S. Senate, has not one major thing to show as an accomplishment for Idaho's families. The only desperation here is Mr. Risch's as he struggles to hold on to the job that pays him $174,000, one he recently said was so easy he could do it permanently.

Source: 2014 Idaho Senate campaign website, NelsMitchellForIdaho.com Jan 15, 2014

Butch Otter: State government should never grow as fast as our economy

I'd like to talk with you about the proper role of government in terms of the next generation--not just the next election--in order to build a more responsible, sustainable and inclusive future. We all want an Idaho where government wisely uses the people's resources to provide the public services and infrastructure needed for our citizens' safety, health and security. And as other institutions & states struggle and often fail to find fiscal balance, we all understand that our responsibilities must be met within the people's means. I hope you share my commitment to ensuring that our State government never grows as fast as our economy and the people's ability to pay for it. So with that as a starting point, I am submitting a budget recommendation today calling for a 3.1% increase in General Fund spending. That reflects slow but steady growth in our economy--an estimated 5.3% revenue increase for fiscal year 2014. It also reflects great uncertainty due to irresponsible federal leadership.
Source: Idaho 2013 State of the State Address Jan 7, 2013

Butch Otter: Great Recession shows need for building Rainy Day accounts

It is with our future in mind that my budget recommendation for fiscal 2014 builds on the great work you have already done in starting to refill our rainy day accounts. As you know, we are putting a total of almost $71 million in the Budget and Public Education stabilization funds by the end of this fiscal year. For next year I'm calling for that effort to continue as a hedge against national and global economic and fiscal uncertainty. The Great Recession showed us beyond any doubt the value of maintaining a healthy financial reserve. As much as any other factor, it set Idaho apart from most other states in response to tough times. We must exercise foresight and frugality while working to sustain and grow our economy. Building up our rainy day funds provides the kind of budget stability that Idaho taxpayers need and expect.
Source: Idaho 2013 State of the State Address Jan 7, 2013

Jim Risch: Bailout plan needs more protection for taxpayers

Risch hates the $700 billion bailout plan, saying, “It didn’t provide enough protection for taxpayers, there was not nearly enough reform in the bill to keep this from happening again, there were no provisions to really go and get after the bad guys that caused this, and lastly and to add insult to injury there were billions of dollars of pork hung onto a bill that was incredibly important to the United States of America.”

LaRocco said he would have voted for the bailout bill because it’s about small companies having the capital and credit to buy a truck or inventory, and because the final version had oversight and taxpayer protections.

LaRocco and Risch agreed that lax regulation led to the economic meltdown. Rammell said overregulation caused the economic disaster. “Fannie and Freddie were required by law to give 42% of their loans to low- and moderate- and high-risk individuals. If we truly lived in a free market economy nobody would have made these high-risk loans. Nobody.”

Source: 2008 Idaho Senate Debate reported in Boise Weekly City Desk Oct 9, 2008

Larry LaRocco: Bailout plan needed to get credit for small companies

Risch hates the $700 billion bailout plan, saying, “It didn’t provide enough protection for taxpayers, there was not nearly enough reform in the bill to keep this from happening again, there were no provisions to really go and get after the bad guys that caused this, and lastly and to add insult to injury there were billions of dollars of pork hung onto a bill that was incredibly important to the United States of America.”

LaRocco said he would have voted for the bailout bill because it’s about small companies having the capital and credit to buy a truck or inventory, and because the final version had oversight and taxpayer protections.

LaRocco and Risch agreed that lax regulation led to the economic meltdown. Rammell said overregulation caused the economic disaster. “Fannie and Freddie were required by law to give 42% of their loans to low- and moderate- and high-risk individuals. If we truly lived in a free market economy nobody would have made these high-risk loans. Nobody.”

Source: 2008 Idaho Senate Debate reported in Boise Weekly City Desk Oct 9, 2008

Rex Rammell: Over-regulation caused the economic disaster

Risch hates the $700 billion bailout plan, saying, “It didn’t provide enough protection for taxpayers, there was not nearly enough reform in the bill to keep this from happening again, there were no provisions to really go and get after the bad guys.”

LaRocco said he would have voted for the bailout bill because it’s about small companies having the capital and credit to buy a truck or inventory, and because the final version had oversight and taxpayer protections.

LaRocco and Risch agreed that lax regulation led to the economic meltdown. Rammell said overregulation caused the economic disaster. “Did you know that Fannie and Freddie were required by law to give 42% of their loans to low- and moderate- and high-risk individuals.... All I hear now is we need more regulations that’s exactly the opposite of what we need. If we truly lived in a free market economy nobody would have made these high-risk loans. Nobody. The banks wouldn’t have done it and the people wouldn’t have dared do it.”

Source: 2008 Idaho Senate Debate reported in Boise Weekly City Desk Oct 9, 2008

Jim Risch: Government cannot replicate what businesses accomplish

Our free market system has produced the greatest, most affluent culture the world has ever seen. Any legislation Congress enacts involving this system must be limited and carefully considered. Government cannot replicate what America's individuals, small businesses and corporations accomplish every year.

It is imperative that Congress find responsible ways to build a strong foundation that promotes job creation through pro-growth policies and lower taxes.

We should make permanent current research and development tax credits-while eliminating all capital gains taxes on start-up and small businesses-to assure the steady flow of investment. These investments are key to pioneering advancements and creating good, high-paying jobs.

Source: Vote-USA.org on 2020 Idaho Senate race Apr 3, 2008

  • The above quotations are from State of Idaho Politicians: Archives.
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2020 Presidential contenders on Budget & Economy:
  Democrats running for President:
Sen.Michael Bennet (D-CO)
V.P.Joe Biden (D-DE)
Mayor Mike Bloomberg (I-NYC)
Gov.Steve Bullock (D-MT)
Mayor Pete Buttigieg (D-IN)
Sen.Cory Booker (D-NJ)
Secy.Julian Castro (D-TX)
Gov.Lincoln Chafee (L-RI)
Rep.John Delaney (D-MD)
Rep.Tulsi Gabbard (D-HI)
Sen.Amy Klobuchar (D-MN)
Gov.Deval Patrick (D-MA)
Sen.Bernie Sanders (I-VT)
CEO Tom Steyer (D-CA)
Sen.Elizabeth Warren (D-MA)
Marianne Williamson (D-CA)
CEO Andrew Yang (D-NY)

2020 Third Party Candidates:
Rep.Justin Amash (L-MI)
CEO Don Blankenship (C-WV)
Gov.Lincoln Chafee (L-RI)
Howie Hawkins (G-NY)
Gov.Gary Johnson(L-NM)
Howard Schultz(I-WA)
Gov.Jesse Ventura (I-MN)
Republicans running for President:
Sen.Ted Cruz(R-TX)
Gov.Larry Hogan (R-MD)
Gov.John Kasich(R-OH)
V.P.Mike Pence(R-IN)
Gov.Mark Sanford (R-SC)
Pres.Donald Trump(R-NY)
Rep.Joe Walsh (R-IL)
Gov.Bill Weld(R-MA & L-NY)

2020 Withdrawn Democratic Candidates:
Sen.Stacey Abrams (D-GA)
Mayor Bill de Blasio (D-NYC)
Sen.Kirsten Gillibrand (D-NY)
Sen.Mike Gravel (D-AK)
Sen.Kamala Harris (D-CA)
Gov.John Hickenlooper (D-CO)
Gov.Jay Inslee (D-WA)
Mayor Wayne Messam (D-FL)
Rep.Seth Moulton (D-MA)
Rep.Beto O`Rourke (D-TX)
Rep.Tim Ryan (D-CA)
Adm.Joe Sestak (D-PA)
Rep.Eric Swalwell (D-CA)
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