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Tom Tancredo on Drugs

Republican Representative (CO-6)


Disallow states from making their own medical marijuana laws

Tancredo voted YES on the “State and Federal Medical Marijuana Law Enforcement and Implementation Act”: An amendment to prohibit the use of funds made available in this Act to the Department of Justice may be used, with respect to certain states, to prevent such States from implementing their own State laws that authorize the use, distribution, possession, or cultivation of medical marijuana.
Source: Project Vote Smart congressional vote analysis Jul 11, 2006

Porous border allows Mexican cartels to smuggle drugs

Corruption is spreading throughout the US that is linked to Mexican based drug cartels and the Mexican mafia. To observers in the law enforcement community, there seems to be a pattern of corruption in which these cartels are buying influence and seeking comfort within US cities. The Tijuana-based Felix drug cartel and the Juarez-based Fuentes cartel began buying legitimate US businesses for money -laundering operations.

IN Cameron County, TX, the former sheriff and others were convicted of receiving drug-smuggling bribes. The Tohono O’odham Indian Reservation in Arizona is the scene of one of the major drug corridors between the US and Mexico. IN 2002, tribal police seized 65,000 pounds of narcotics.

Source: In Mortal Danger, by Tom Tancredo, p. 82-84 Jun 6, 2006

Mexican military helps drug smugglers cross border

Mexico has long been a haven for violent drug cartels as well as the primary source for most illegal immigration. But in recent years, suspected Mexican paramilitary & military units, loyal to the drug cartels, have made repeated armed incursions into th US--with the knowledge of our government. The Dept. of Homeland Security has documented 231 incursions from 1996 to 2005.

Most disturbing was the response. DHS Secretary Michael Chertoff downplayed the events by saying that most Mexican military incursions over the years had been “accidental.” The FBI was quoted by Mexican media as saying it supported the view that the uniformed personnel were smugglers and not Mexican military.

Does the Mexican government want us to believe that the drug cartels can operate freely along the border and the Mexican military is powerless to stop them? Sadly, the federal government is more concerned about allowing the Mexican government to save face than it is about telling the truth to the American people.

Source: In Mortal Danger, by Tom Tancredo, p.146-149 Jun 6, 2006

Voted YES on military border patrols to battle drugs & terrorism.

Amendment to set up a task force on counter-terrorism and drug interdiction and allow military personnel to help patrol U.S. borders.
Bill HR 2586 ; vote number 2001-356 on Sep 25, 2001

Voted YES on prohibiting needle exchange & medical marijuana in DC.

Vote to pass a bill that provides $429.1 million in funds for the District of Columbia and approves the District's $6.8 billion budget. Among other provisions, the bill prohibits the use of federal funds for needle exchange programs, prohibits implementing an approved ballot initiative to legalize the medicinal use of marijuana.
Reference: Bill sponsored by Istook, R-OK; Bill HR 3064 ; vote number 1999-504 on Oct 14, 1999

Rated +20 by NORML, indicating a pro-drug-reform stance.

Tancredo scores +20 by the NORML on drug reform

OnTheIssues.org interprets the 2006 NORML scores as follows:

About NORML (from their website, www.norml.org):

National Organization for the Reform of Marijuana Law's mission is to move public opinion sufficiently to achieve the repeal of marijuana prohibition so that the responsible use of cannabis by adults is no longer subject to penalty.

NORML is a nonprofit, public-interest lobby that for more than 30 years has provided a voice for those Americans who oppose marijuana prohibition. We represent the interests of the tens of millions of Americans who smoke marijuana responsibly and believe the recreational and medicinal use of marijuana should no longer be a crime.

NORML supports the removal of all criminal penalties for the private possession & responsible use of marijuana by adults, including the cultivation for personal use, and the casual nonprofit transfers of small amounts. This model is called "decriminalization."

NORML additionally supports the development of a legally controlled market for marijuana, where consumers could purchase it from a safe, legal and regulated source. This model is referred to as "legalization."

NORML believes that marijuana smoking is not for kids and should only be used responsibly by adults. As with alcohol consumption, it must never be an excuse for misconduct or other bad behavior. Driving or operating heavy equipment while impaired from marijuana should be prohibited.

NORML strongly supports the right of patients to use marijuana as a medicine when their physician recommends it to relieve pain and suffering.

Lastly, NORML supports the right of farmers to commercially cultivate hemp for industrial purposes, such as food and fiber production.

Source: NORML website 06n-NORML on Dec 31, 2006

Other candidates on Drugs: Tom Tancredo on other issues:
Nominees:
GOP: Sen.John McCain
GOP V.P.: Gov.Sarah Palin
Democrat: Sen.Barack Obama
Dem.V.P.: Sen.Joe Biden

Third Parties:
Constitution: Chuck Baldwin
Libertarian: Rep.Bob Barr
Constitution: Amb.Alan Keyes
Liberation: Gloria La Riva
Green: Rep.Cynthia McKinney
Socialist: Brian Moore
Independent: Ralph Nader
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Page last updated: Feb 08, 2010