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Mike Bloomberg on Government Reform

Mayor of New York City (Independent)


Make getting on the ballot easier, & better people will run

On Election Reform: "If you want to get the best people to run for office, we've got to make the rules easier, and simpler, and more understandable to get on the ballot."

"Government by three men in a room has turned New York State into a national symbol of governmental dysfunction. Enough is enough!"

Source: Quotation cited during 2013 campaign on WikiQuote.org , Apr 1, 2013

Failed to lure Olympics to New York City

In his first term, he led the city out of recession, smoothly managing the city's finances and services, keeping the central promise of his self-financed campaign to steer clear of influence peddlers and favor-seekers. Despite his bland persona, Bloomberg pursued bold projects full of political risk.

More than once, Bloomberg's ambitions outran his political skills and led to highly visible defeats. He failed to lure the Olympics to NY or build a grand stadium in a dilapidated stretch pf Manhattan. He lost a campaign to force private cars out of midtown, and while his overhaul of the city schools is in itself an achievement, whether it will produce a better-educated generation is a matter of protracted debate.

Source: Bloomberg: Money, Power, Politics, by Joyce Purnick, p. 4 , Sep 28, 2010

2005: 8-year term limits; 2009: ran for 3rd term

Influential friends, sensing a lack of impressive mayoral prospects, urged him to run for a 3rd term. As everyone knew, the 2-term mayoral limit law stood in the way. So what? His friends thought he could have it changed.

Bloomberg actually owed his job to that law, which had forced an obviously reluctant Rudy Giuliani to depart from City Hall. Moreover, Bloomberg had consistently and vehemently supported the limits. "This is an outrage!" he exclaimed in 2005, when the city council toyed with a plan to extend the limit on everyone's service from 2 terms to 3. "There's no organization that I know," Bloomberg had said, "that would put somebody in charge for a long period of time. You always want turnover and change. 8 years is great. You learn for 4 years. You can do for 4 years."

On October 2, Bloomberg made it official, announcing his 3rd-term plan, citing a "crisis of confidence" in the economy,

Source: Bloomberg: Money, Power, Politics, by J. Purnick, p.179-186 , Sep 28, 2010

All presidential candidates should declare an issues matrix

Mayor Bloomberg is using his campaign promise record as an excuse to talk about presidential politics, saying yesterday that the press must hold presidential candidates accountable and force them to explain their solutions to tough issues.

By the mayors count, his administration is fulfilling 96% of the 100 promises made during the 2005 campaign. More than 91% of the 482 promises made during the 2005 and 2001 campaigns are completed or are being implemented, he said.

Im not running for president, but I do think that every presidential candidate should put out a list of every single one of the key issues, Bloomberg said. If some of them miss some of them, go and get them to fill those in and create a matrix. This is what Id do.

Source: Grace Rauh, New York Sun , May 8, 2007

2001: opposed Giuliani extending NYC term limit

On the eve of Yom Kippur, the holiest day of the year for people of the Jewish faith--a day of fasting, prayer, introspection, and atonement--Bloomberg floated a trial balloon in a clumsy attempt to override the city's term limits legislation and extend his final term in office for at least three months.

Everybody was terrified and nobody knew what was going to happen. And the thought of changing mayors at that time made a lot of people very, very, very scared. When he came up with that idea, Giuliani's advisors wanted to do what was right for the city. Interestingly, Bloomberg didn't think so. The only thing I can think of is that Bloomberg was being very closely advised by Koch, who probably understood the dynamics of politics better than anyone, and might have said to him, "It's a mistake; you can't change constitutional terms."

Source: Giuliani: Flawed or Flawless, by D. & G. Strober, p.285-286 , Jan 16, 2007

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Other big-city mayors on Government Reform: Mike Bloomberg on other issues:

Mike Bloomberg (I,New York City)
Cory Booker (D,Newark,NJ)
Julian Castro (D,San Antonio,TX)
Rahm Emanuel (D,Chicago)
Phil Gordon (D,Phoenix)
Tom Menino (D,Boston)
Michael Nutter (D,Philadelphia)
Annise Parker (D,Houston)
Mike Rawlings (D,Dallas)
Jerry Sanders (R,San Diego)
Antonio Villaraigosa (D,Los Angeles)

Former Mayors:
Rocky Anderson (I,Salt Lake City)
Tom Barrett (D,Milwaukee,WI)
Jerry Brown (D,Oakland,CA)
Rudy Giuliani (R,New York City)
Dennis Kucinch (D,Cleveland,OH)
Sarah Palin (R,Wasilla,AK)
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Page last updated: Jul 06, 2014