State of Wisconsin Archives: on Welfare & Poverty


Tony Evers: No work requirement for adults under 50 receiving Medicaid

SB886: Childless adults who are age 19 years to 50 years [must] participate in 80 hours per calendar month of community engagement activities, unless they are exempt for good cause.

The Capital Times analysis 12/5/18:This bill deals with Medicaid waivers and fortifies a requirement that those who receive Medicaid benefits also hold a job. Trump's administration approved the work requirement, but Gov.-elect Tony Evers said he is considering ending the policy. Dozens of healthcare organizations and insurers opposed the plan, arguing that it could result in diminished access to healthcare for some.

A.P. update 1/29/20: Gov. Evers tried to block the work requirement, but the Republican-controlled Legislature kept it. Evers' administration has said it would implement it, but delayed from Nov. 2019 until April 2020.

Legislative Outcome: Passed Assembly 60-31-8 on Dec/4/18; Passed Senate 18-15-0 on Dec/4/18; Signed by Governor Scott Walker on Dec/14/18

Source: A.P. & The Capital Times on Wisconsin SB886 voting records Jan 29, 2020

Scott Walker: Work requirement for adults under 50 receiving Medicaid

SB886: Childless adults who are age 19 years to 50 years [must] participate in 80 hours per calendar month of community engagement activities, unless they are exempt for good cause.

The Capital Times analysis 12/5/18:This bill deals with Medicaid waivers and fortifies a requirement that those who receive Medicaid benefits also hold a job. Trump's administration approved the work requirement, but Gov.-elect Tony Evers said he is considering ending the policy. Dozens of healthcare organizations and insurers opposed the plan, arguing that it could result in diminished access to healthcare for some.

A.P. update 1/29/20: Gov. Evers tried to block the work requirement, but the Republican-controlled Legislature kept it. Evers' administration has said it would implement it, but delayed from Nov. 2019 until April 2020.

Legislative Outcome: Passed Assembly 60-31-8 on Dec/4/18; Passed Senate 18-15-0 on Dec/4/18; Signed by Governor Scott Walker on Dec/14/18

Source: A.P. & The Capital Times on Wisconsin SB886 voting records Dec 14, 2018

Scott Fitzgerald: Work requirement for adults under 50 receiving Medicaid

SB886: Childless adults who are age 19 years to 50 years [must] participate in 80 hours per calendar month of community engagement activities, unless they are exempt for good cause.

The Capital Times analysis 12/5/18:This bill deals with Medicaid waivers and fortifies a requirement that those who receive Medicaid benefits also hold a job. Trump's administration approved the work requirement, but Gov.-elect Tony Evers said he is considering ending the policy. Dozens of healthcare organizations and insurers opposed the plan, arguing that it could result in diminished access to healthcare for some.

A.P. update 1/29/20: Gov. Evers tried to block the work requirement, but the Republican-controlled Legislature kept it. Evers' administration has said it would implement it, but delayed from until April 2020.

Legislative Outcome: Passed Assembly 60-31-8 on 12/4/18; Passed Senate 18-15-0 on 12/4; Sen. Fitzgerald voted YES; Signed by Gov. Walker on 12/14

Source: A.P. & The Capital Times on Wisconsin SB886 voting records Dec 4, 2018

Tom Tiffany: Work requirement for adults under 50 receiving Medicaid

SB886: Childless adults who are age 19 years to 50 years [must] participate in 80 hours per calendar month of community engagement activities, unless they are exempt for good cause.

The Capital Times analysis 12/5/18:This bill deals with Medicaid waivers and fortifies a requirement that those who receive Medicaid benefits also hold a job. Trump's administration approved the work requirement, but Gov.-elect Tony Evers said he is considering ending the policy. Dozens of healthcare organizations and insurers opposed the plan, arguing that it could result in diminished access to healthcare for some.

A.P. update 1/29/20: Gov. Evers tried to block the work requirement, but the Republican-controlled Legislature kept it. Evers' administration has said it would implement it, but delayed from until April 2020.

Legislative Outcome: Passed Assembly 60-31-8 on 12/4/18; Passed Senate 18-15-0 on 12/4; State Sen. Tiffany voted YES; Signed by Gov. Walker on 12/14

Source: A.P. & The Capital Times on Wisconsin SB886 voting records Dec 4, 2018

Kathleen Vinehout: As a society, we must help and support those that need it

All of us at some time need support from our community. We put people first when, as a community, we provide those supports that give individuals the opportunity to live their lives more fully. We put people first when those who work don't have to worry about child care. We put people first when we fund alternatives to incarceration.˙When we provide treatment instead of punishment for addiction and mental health illness. We put people first when we provide support for those with disabilities.
Source: 2018 Wisconsin Gubernatorial website KathleenVinehout.org Feb 22, 2018

Hillary Clinton: Address distressed communities and generational poverty

I am concerned about what's happening in every community in America, and that includes white communities, where we are seeing an increase in alcoholism, addiction, earlier deaths. I'm going to do everything I can to address distressed communities, whether they are communities of color, whether they are white communities. I particularly appreciate the proposal that Congressman Jim Clyburn has--the 10-20-30 proposal--to spend more federal dollars in communities with generational poverty.
Source: 2016 PBS Democratic debate in Wisconsin Feb 11, 2016

Glenn Grothman: Concerned about massive trend towards government dependency

Glenn has been a longtime advocate for reform of the welfare system. He is very concerned about the massive trend towards government dependency.

The number of people on Food Stamps has gone from 17 million as recently as 2001 to 47 million today. The number of people on disability has risen from 5 million people to almost 9 million people in the last thirteen years, all while job safety has improved greatly.

The rush towards government reliance is resulting in the erosion of the American family, which will have severe, negative consequences for the next generation. Glenn has introduced legislation in Wisconsin to reform these programs, but again and again changes are blocked by federal laws and never-ending regulations that preempt reforms on the state level.

Congress needs a leader to stand up and fight. Glenn has consistently proven he is unafraid to tackle even the most formidable issues. He will fight to make reform of these government programs a top priority for Republicans.

Source: 2014 Wisconsin House campaign website, GlennGrothman.com May 31, 2014

Scott Walker: Help transition from government dependence to independence

Years ago, under Governor Doyle, eligibility for BadgerCare Plus went up, but not enough funds were budgeted, so many people living in poverty were put on a waiting list. This year, for the first time in Wisconsin history, everyone living in poverty will be able to access health care under Medicaid.

For those living above poverty, we transition them into the marketplace. I believe Medicaid is for those living in poverty, and our goal should be to help lift more and more people out of the depths of economic despair.

Our Wisconsin Plan is unique as we are able to cover everyone living in poverty, reduce the number of uninsured, and still not expose Wisconsin taxpayers to the uncertain potential cost of the federal Medicaid expansion.

Helping more people transition from government dependence to true independence is not only good for the taxpayers, it is good for employers, too. Most importantly, it is good for the people, who can now control their own lives and their own destinies.

Source: 2014 State of the State Address to Wisconsin legislature Jan 22, 2014

Tommy Thompson: Replace Welfare with the Tools to Succeed

Gov. Thompson made building our people - particularly the poor - an important priority. Frustrated that generations of families were being locked in a welfare trap, Thompson embarked on welfare reform in 1987, long before it became a major national issue

Before starting, Thompson invited groups of welfare mothers to his home for luncheon discussions on what locked them into welfare and what was needed to free them from the trap. The most commonly cited barriers to leaving welfare were inadequate child care, health care, transportation and training - four elements that became the foundation for the governor’s reform programs.

Since 1987, Thompson has instituted many welfare reform programs and initiatives that have combined to reduce Wisconsin’s welfare caseload by more than any state in the nation.

Since 1987, Wisconsin has cut its welfare caseload by more than 93%, from 98,000 AFDC families in January 1987 to under 6,700 W-2 cash assistance families in February 2000.

Source: Wisconsin Governor’s web site Dec 25, 2000

Tommy Thompson: Early leader in welfare reform

Wisconsin was so far ahead in its reforms that Gov. Thompson ended welfare and the AFDC entitlement check altogether and replaced it with a new program based on work called Wisconsin Works, better known as W-2. This program is now the standard for welfare reform in America.
Source: Wisconsin Governor’s web site Dec 25, 2000

  • The above quotations are from State of Wisconsin Politicians: Archives.
  • Click here for definitions & background information on Welfare & Poverty.
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2020 Presidential contenders on Welfare & Poverty:
  Democrats running for President:
Sen.Michael Bennet (D-CO)
V.P.Joe Biden (D-DE)
Mayor Mike Bloomberg (I-NYC)
Gov.Steve Bullock (D-MT)
Mayor Pete Buttigieg (D-IN)
Sen.Cory Booker (D-NJ)
Secy.Julian Castro (D-TX)
Gov.Lincoln Chafee (L-RI)
Rep.John Delaney (D-MD)
Rep.Tulsi Gabbard (D-HI)
Sen.Amy Klobuchar (D-MN)
Gov.Deval Patrick (D-MA)
Sen.Bernie Sanders (I-VT)
CEO Tom Steyer (D-CA)
Sen.Elizabeth Warren (D-MA)
Marianne Williamson (D-CA)
CEO Andrew Yang (D-NY)

2020 Third Party Candidates:
Rep.Justin Amash (L-MI)
CEO Don Blankenship (C-WV)
Gov.Lincoln Chafee (L-RI)
Howie Hawkins (G-NY)
Gov.Gary Johnson(L-NM)
Howard Schultz(I-WA)
Gov.Jesse Ventura (I-MN)
Republicans running for President:
Sen.Ted Cruz(R-TX)
Gov.Larry Hogan (R-MD)
Gov.John Kasich(R-OH)
V.P.Mike Pence(R-IN)
Gov.Mark Sanford (R-SC)
Pres.Donald Trump(R-NY)
Rep.Joe Walsh (R-IL)
Gov.Bill Weld(R-MA & L-NY)

2020 Withdrawn Democratic Candidates:
Sen.Stacey Abrams (D-GA)
Mayor Bill de Blasio (D-NYC)
Sen.Kirsten Gillibrand (D-NY)
Sen.Mike Gravel (D-AK)
Sen.Kamala Harris (D-CA)
Gov.John Hickenlooper (D-CO)
Gov.Jay Inslee (D-WA)
Mayor Wayne Messam (D-FL)
Rep.Seth Moulton (D-MA)
Rep.Beto O`Rourke (D-TX)
Rep.Tim Ryan (D-CA)
Adm.Joe Sestak (D-PA)
Rep.Eric Swalwell (D-CA)
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Page last updated: Oct 14, 2021