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Will Hurd on Immigration

 

 


We need strong disincentives to prevent illegal immigration

We have benefitted from the brain drain from every other country in the world. We need to benefit from the hard working drain as well, and we need immigration policy in place that puts strong disincentives from coming here illegally so we have a much more manageable immigration system.
Source: 2024 Presidential campaign website WillBHurd.com , Jun 23, 2023

There are common sense solutions, but pols have to sell them

What's happening at the border is an absolute crisis. There's ways to solve the problem, there's ways to actually improve and streamline legal immigration, have more people coming inů We need people that are willing to go out there and sell some of these ideas. It's hard to explain how you solve immigration and the border crisis in 280 characters, but it requires people to go out and make that case, and explain these common sense solutions to these complicated problems.
Source: Meet the Press on 2023 Presidential hopefuls , May 14, 2023

Border wall is 3rd-century solution to 21st-century problem

Congressman Will Hurd is an increasingly lonely voice in the "build the wall" Republican Party of Donald Trump. Hurd represents one of the largest congressional districts in America, Texas' 23rd, a vast expanse of land roughly the size of Georgia that stretches from San Antonio to El Paso. Hurd's district includes 820 miles of the U.S.-Mexico border, more than any other member of the House of Representatives. But if you're expecting Hurd, who was narrowly re-elected to a third term last year, to support President Trump's "big, beautiful wall" and stand with the decision to partially shut down the federal government over the fight, you've got it all wrong. Trump's border crisis is a "myth," Hurd tells Rolling Stone, and a wall made of cement or steel slats is a "third-century solution to a 21st-century problem."
Source: Rolling Stone magazine on 2018 Congressional TX-23 election , Jan 18, 2019

Voted YES to ban DREAMer immigrants from military service.

Hurd voted YEA Gosar Anti-DACA Amendment to H.R. 5293

Congressional Summary: The House voted on an amendment by Rep. Paul Gosar (R-AZ) to H.R. 5293, the Department of Defense Appropriations Act of 2017. The amendment would prohibit funds from being used to extend the expiration of, or reissue a new expiration date to, the Military Accessions Vital to National Interest (MAVNI) program.

Recommendation by Heritage Foundation to vote YES:(6/16/2016): The MAVNI program is a pilot program authorizing `military services to recruit certain legal immigrants whose skills are considered to be vital to the national interest.` However, a DoD memo has made it clear that DACA/DAPA recipients are eligible under this program, essentially opening up a pathway to amnesty for illegal aliens who enlist. By ensuring that this guidance ends, DOD will no longer be able to enlist illegal immigrants through MAVNI.

Recommendation by the ACLU to vote NO: (6/28/2011): The DREAM Act promotes fundamental fairness for young people by allowing access to affordable post-secondary education and military service opportunities, regardless of immigration status, and would provide a path to citizenship for undocumented immigrants who came to the U.S. as children, have lived here for at least five years and have graduated from high school. The DREAM Act could result in billions of dollars in additional tax revenue from tapping the potential of DREAM-eligible students and future service personnel. Since September 11, 2001, more than 69,000 immigrants have earned citizenship while serving, and more than 125 who entered military service after that date have made the ultimate sacrifice in war by giving their lives for this nation.

Legislative outcome: Failed House 210 to 211 (no Senate vote)

Source: Congressional vote 16-H5293 on Jun 16, 2016

Increase both high-skill and family-based visa caps.

Hurd co-sponsored the Fairness for High-Skilled Immigrants Act

Legislative Summary:This bill increases the per-country cap on family-based immigrant visas from 7% of the total number of such visas available that year to 15%, and eliminates the 7% cap for employment-based immigrant visas. It also removes an offset that reduced the number of visas for individuals from China. The bill also establishes transition rules for employment-based visas from FY2020-FY2022, by reserving a percentage of EB-2 (workers with advanced degrees or exceptional ability), EB-3 (skilled and other workers), and EB-5 (investors) visas for individuals not from the two countries with the largest number of recipients of such visas. Of the unreserved visas, not more than 85% shall be allotted to immigrants from any single country.

Explanation from the Countable.US: Under the current immigration system, immigrants from any one country can claim no more than 7% of the 140,000 employment-based green cards issued annually to foreign nationals working in the U.S. This significantly disadvantages immigrants from larger countries that more immigrants come from.

For example, China (population 1.3 billion) and India have large backlogs of workers wishing to immigrate to and work in the U.S., but they have the name visa caps as countries such as Iceland or Estonia (population 1.3 million), which have both much smaller populations and far fewer citizens seeking to immigrate to the U.S.

The net effect of this is that immigrants from India and China can face decades-long waits, averaging 2-3 times the wait times for immigrants from other countries, for green cards, and many have to return home because they can`t get permanent residency; meanwhile, countries such as Iceland and Estonia never come close to reaching their visa limit caps.

Legislative outcome Roll call 437 in House on 7/10/2019 passed 365-65-2; referred to Committee in Senate 7/9/2019; no action as of 1/1/2020.

Source: S.386/H.R.1044 19-HR1044 on Feb 7, 2019

Other candidates on Immigration: Will Hurd on other issues:
2024 Republican Presidential Candidates:
Gov. Doug Burgum (R-ND)
Gov. Chris Christie (R-NJ)
Gov. Ron DeSantis (R-FL)
Larry Elder (R-CA;withdrew)
Gov. Nikki Haley (R-SC)
Rep. Will Hurd (R-FL;withdrew)
Gov. Asa Hutchinson (R-AR)
Perry Johnson (R-IL)
Mayor Steve Laffey (R-RI)
Former V.P.Mike Pence (R-IN;withdrew)
Vivek Ramaswamy (R-OH)
Sen. Tim Scott (R-SC)
Secy. Corey Stapleton (R-MT)
Mayor Francis Suarez (R-FL;withdrew)
Former Pres.Donald Trump (R-NY)

2024 Democratic and 3rd-party primary candidates:
Pres. Joe Biden (D-DE)
V.P.Kamala Harris (D-CA)
Robert F. Kennedy, Jr. (I-NY)
Joe "Exotic" Maldonado (Libertarian)
Rep.Dean Phillips (D-MN)
Cornel West (Green Party)
Kanye West (Birthday Party)
Marianne Williamson (D-CA)
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External Links about Will Hurd:
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Page last updated: Nov 18, 2023; copyright 1999-2022 Jesse Gordon and OnTheIssues.org