State of North Carolina secondary Archives: on Education


Ted Budd: Member of the Home School Legal Defense Association

He is committed to strengthening the family and recognizes the cultural battle we face to protect it. He is a member of the Home School Legal Defense Association and has served as a board member of North Carolinians for Home Education. He met his wife Amy Kate in the former Soviet Union on a mission trip in 1991, the week before the collapse of communism. They still enjoy mission trips and serve in their church.
Source: 2022 North Carolina Senate campaign website TedBudd.com Apr 28, 2021

Pat McCrory: 2015: For budget cuts, tuition increases at state schools

Whereas President Biden and many Democrats have pushed for student loan forgiveness and either lowering or eliminating public university tuition, McCrory supported budget cuts for the UNC System and an increase in community college tuition under his 2015-16 budget.
Source: The NCSU Technician on 2022 North Carolina Senate race Apr 19, 2021

Mark Walker: Has championed school choice; empower parents and students

Source: 2022 North Carolina Senate campaign website Walker4NC.com Dec 9, 2020

Thom Tillis: More loan relief to students during the COVID-19 pandemic

Q: Under what circumstances should taxpayers help pay off existing student loans?

A: I introduced bipartisan legislation that gives more loan relief to students during the COVID-19 pandemic in addition to the student relief that I previously voted for in the CARES Act. I recognize that this pandemic has put undue strain on those with student loan debt, and I was proud to work on legislation to reduce the burden for our nation's students.

Source: AFA iVoterGuide on 2020 North Carolina Senate race Nov 3, 2020

Cal Cunningham: Phase out school vouchers to pay for private school

Q: Use public funding for private schools?

Cal Cunningham: No. Supports phasing out school vouchers to pay for private-school tuition.

Thom Tillis: Yes. Supports vouchers for students to attend private schools with government assistance.

Source: CampusElect survey of 2020 North Carolina Senate race Sep 30, 2020

Thom Tillis: Supports vouchers for students to attend private schools

Q: Use public funding for private schools?

Thom Tillis: Yes. Supports vouchers for students to attend private schools with government assistance.

Cal Cunningham: No. Supports phasing out school vouchers to pay for private-school tuition.

Source: CampusElect survey of 2020 North Carolina Senate race Sep 30, 2020

Cal Cunningham: Public education should be an engine of opportunity for all

The quality of our children's education shouldn't depend on where they grow up, their family circumstances, their race, their wealth, or a disability, and Cal believes that public education--and the investments we make in our children through schools--should be an engine of opportunity for all North Carolinians. Cal will fight to pay teachers what they deserve, to develop, respect, and strengthen the profession, and to recruit, train, and retain the best educators for our students.

Cal is a longtime supporter of early childhood education, including having voted in the state Senate to start what is now North Carolina Pre-K, and is committed to investment in our children through Head Start and other early childhood programs that address the needs of the whole child. To build capacity to deliver early childhood education, we need to develop a more robust pipeline of early childhood educators.

Source: 2020 North Carolina Senate campaign website CalForNC.com Jun 10, 2020

Cal Cunningham: Lower cost of college; expand access; reduce burden of debt

Cal will lead the fight to lower the cost of college, expand access to community college and technical training, and reduce the burden of student loan debt. North Carolina also has a proud tradition of strong public universities and our Historically Black Colleges and Universities are a critical part of our higher education system. Cal will work to ensure the federal government increases investment and support for these important institutions.
Source: 2020 North Carolina Senate campaign website CalForNC.com Jun 10, 2020

Al Pisano: Vouchers for school choice

Q: Do you support or oppose the statement, "Vouchers for school choice"?

A: Support

Source: OnTheIssues 2020 interview on North Carolina Governor race Apr 30, 2020

Cal Cunningham: Expand Pell Grants; allow refinancing of student loans

The opportunity to pursue higher education should be available to anyone who seeks it. We can start by expanding Pell Grants, fixing the Public Service Loan Forgiveness Program, and giving students the ability to refinance their loans at a lower rate. We should also expand and support the American Opportunity Tax Credit, and work to remove cost as a barrier to community college and technical training.
Source: The UNC Daily Tar Heel on 2020 North Carolina Senate race Apr 6, 2020

Roy Cooper: Proposed 9.1% pay increase for teachers, 8.5% compromise

From my first day in office, I've fought for better teacher pay and funding for our classrooms. My 2019-20 budget proposed a 9.1% increase for teachers, and my compromise offer included an increase of 8.5% over two years with no plateaus and a pay raise for every teacher. Legislative Republicans, on the other hand, want just a 3.9% increase over 2 years with some teachers left out.
Source: Raleigh News-Observer on 2020 North Carolina Governor race Mar 2, 2020

Dan Forest: Provide students with options: Opportunity Scholarships

I believe it's critical to provide students with options for a sound education - especially Opportunity Scholarships for families with no other options. When I am Governor, we will offer parents choices in education and the ability to find the setting that works best for their child. We will also move toward a competency-based system that makes sure our children are learning rather than being shuttled through an outdated and ineffective system.
Source: News & Observer on 2020 North Carolina gubernatorial race Feb 18, 2020

Holly Grange: Wants teacher pay to be tops in the region

I want North Carolina to be the top state in the region when it comes to teacher pay. I believe we need to recruit and retain the best teachers in the country. We have given teachers pay raises every year that I've been in the legislature and I believe the 3.9% raise we gave this year is fair. It's certainly bigger than 0% which Governor Cooper has given them by vetoing those raises.
Source: News & Observer on 2020 North Carolina gubernatorial race Feb 18, 2020

Erica Smith: Strengthen public schools, emphasis on future workers

I believe it is time to bring a universally progressive, business-minded and workforce connected emphasis to K-12 education. We should further tailor individualized education plans that prepare every student for a brighter future regardless of their choice of learning environment (Traditional, Home, Virtual, Charter, Nonpublic, hybrid). I will work to provide a quality K-12 education for students and the resources they need with a priority on strengthening the public schools of our nation.
Source: 2020 North Carolina Senate website EricaForUS.org Feb 7, 2020

Erica Smith: Make Community Colleges as affordable as possible

Community Colleges with strong curriculum programs and short-term workforce training offer the optimized option for retooling our workforce and ensuring the security of America with an educated citizenry and large pool of skilled labor. We must make Community College as affordable as possible, or at minimal cost of less than $500 in tuition per term. Through apprenticeship programs--we can enhance the workforce needed for 21st century jobs and professions that do not require a degree.
Source: 2020 North Carolina Senate website EricaForUS.org Feb 7, 2020

Dan Forest: A leader in the school choice movement

Dan has become a leader in the school choice movement as a way to help children succeed regardless of their ZIP code. Dan also spearheaded an initiative to connect every classroom in North Carolina with high-speed internet and championed a bill to preserve free speech rights on public college campuses--the first bill of its kind in the United States.
Source: 2020 North Carolina Governor campaign website DanForest.com Dec 3, 2019

Dan Forest: Expand voucher program for every family

Expand the Opportunity Scholarship program to every N.C. family. This highly successful program allows low-income families to access private schools through a voucher worth as much as $4,200. We will protect the Opportunity Scholarship program for our low-income families. Further, we will expand the eligibility criteria to allow every family in North Carolina the chance to choose a school that works for them.
Source: 2020 North Carolina Governor campaign website DanForest.com Dec 3, 2019

Dan Forest: Every public school needs strong principal & armed guard

Rather than defer to teachers' unions and high-paid administrators, the Forest administration will always put students first. This starts with our "Four in the Door" program, making sure every public school has these four positions.
  1. A principal with full authority to hire and fire
  2. An armed security guard
  3. A computer science teacher
  4. A trade professional
Source: 2020 North Carolina Governor campaign website DanForest.com Dec 3, 2019

Dan Forest: Support school choice and competition in education

Source: Ballotpedia.org on 2020 North Carolina Governor race Sep 9, 2019

Eric Mansfield: Focus education on employment and economy

On Education and Employment: I believe that meeting the challenges of employment and education in North Carolina are one in the same. Economic recovery in North Carolina will be dependent on our ability to produce a competitive work force which can retain and attract new jobs to our state.
Source: Ballotpedia.org Connection: 2020 North Carolina Senate race Sep 9, 2019

Garland Tucker: Criticized Congress for not cutting Education Dept. budget

DeVos boldly submitted a $9 billion year-to-year reduction for her department. How did the Republican Congress respond? It granted the department a $2.6 billion increase in appropriations, instead of the requested cut. With control of both houses of Congress and the presidency -- and with a secretary pleading for reduced appropriations -- is this the best the GOP can do? If so, loyal Republicans should be asking themselves: "What difference does my vote (or my campaign contribution) make?"
Source: Real Clear Policy blog on 2020 North Carolina Senate race Apr 9, 2019

Roy Cooper: $8 billion in building or renovating schools

Public education is our most important job as a state. We must do better.

Let's give kids a better start by investing more in early childhood education. We've worked together to expand pre-K to thousands more students, but we shouldn't stop until every child has it.

Let's give our students safe, healthy places to learn. Right now, 4 in 10 public schools in our state are at least 50 years old. That means they're still using the schools you and I went to. That's great for nostalgia, but not so good for students in classrooms with unreliable heat, leaking roofs or crumbling walls. K through 12 schools need at least 8 billion dollars in new construction and renovations let's have the people vote on a strong school construction bond.

Source: 2019 State of the State address to North Carolina congress Feb 25, 2019

Roy Cooper: Increased teacher pay before tax cuts for the 1%

Too often, public schools have taken a back seat to tax breaks for those at the very top. Simply put, public education is our most important job as a state. We must do better. If we want our educators to teach well, we need to treat them well. North Carolina is still ranked 37th in teacher pay nationwide. That's not the respect they deserve. When I send you my budget, we'll put our schools and our teachers first.
Source: 2019 State of the State address to North Carolina congress Feb 25, 2019

Roy Cooper: 4,700 additional Pre-K slots for at-risk 4-year olds

As I have traveled the width and breadth of North Carolina, it doesn't matter where I am or who I'm talking to, people want us to make education better. When I'm recruiting a business to come here, the first thing they ask is whether North Carolina has the workers skilled enough to fill the jobs they create.

I've laid out aggressive goals to make North Carolina a Top Ten Educated State by 2025--emphasizing early childhood education, increasing enrollment in pre-kindergarten, improving our high school graduation rate and increasing the percentage of adults with a higher education degree.

My budget creates nearly 4,700 additional Pre-Kindergarten slots to eliminate the wait-list of at-risk four year olds. Getting more kids in pre-K means they'll arrive at school ready to learn. It's the foundation for a lifetime of success, showing economic and health benefits well beyond their pre-K years. And it allows both parents to stay in the workforce, a necessity for many North Carolina families.

Source: 2017 North Carolina State of the State address Mar 13, 2017

Roy Cooper: NC GROW: Getting Ready for Opportunities in the Workforce

In my talks with business owners, I hear time and again that they have job openings, but can't find workers with the skills necessary to fill them. We know the problem and we have the answer: educated workers with high-tech critical thinking skills, earned at our high schools, community colleges and universities.

To give people in the middle class more opportunity to afford higher education, let's pass a workforce program we call NC GROW- Getting Ready for Opportunities in the Workforce. It means free community college--a scholarship to cover last-dollar tuition and fees for recent high school graduates to attend a North Carolina community college.

To earn it, young people have to make good grades and apply for already-existing scholarships, loans and grant programs. It's an idea that Republican and Democratic governors alike have supported in other states. We can make it a bipartisan reality here in North Carolina.

Source: 2017 North Carolina State of the State address Mar 13, 2017

Ted Budd: Parents choose what's best: public, private, or homeschool

Every child deserves an education that makes the most of their God-given talent. Parents should have an opportunity to educate their child in the best public, private, or homeschool environment that they choose. Programs like Common Core illustrate the absurdity of putting Washington DC bureaucrats in charge of classrooms, instead of parents, teachers, and principals.
Source: 2016 North Carolina House campaign website TedBudd.com Nov 8, 2016

Deborah Ross: Make first two years of community college free

Q: On Student Debt: Refinance student loans at lower rates, paid for by increasing taxes on high earners?

Burr: No. Supported bills to simplify repayment, but opposed expanding subsidies to support refinancing.

Ross: Yes. Supports refinancing student loan debt, reining in private for-profit colleges, & making first two years of community college free.

Q: On Student Financial Aid: Should federal student financial aid, like Pell Grants, be increased?

Burr: No

Ross: Yes

Source: CampusElect Voter Guide to 2016 North Carolina Senate race Oct 9, 2016

Ken Spaulding: Private school vouchers will re-segregate our public schools

Spaulding said he welcomed criticism on school choice from Gov. Pat McCrory's re-election campaign: "While Gov. Pat McCrory supports privatizing and weakening North Carolina's public schools at the taxpayers' expense I support strengthening our public schools through better funding and better teacher pay," Spaulding said. "Taxpayer dollars being used for `private' school vouchers is an admission by the governor that he wants to take children out of public schools instead of enhancing our public schools. We should make our public schools so competitive that private school children would be seeking to return to our public schools. The Governor's approach to public education is leading to the re-segregation of our public schools. So no, I will not stop fighting for our public schools and our school teachers. I will oppose the governor and any of his attempts to weaken North Carolina's public school system and the many young children who are being served."
Source: News-Observer on 2016 North Carolina gubernatorial race Jan 26, 2016

Pat McCrory: Expand school choice, charter schools and home schools

Gov. Pat McCrory's re-election campaign singled out primary contender Ken Spaulding. McCrory's email touted his expansion of charter schools and support of home schools: "But while we're focused on helping students and families, Democrats like Ken Spaulding and special interest groups predictably have been attacking school choice both inside and outside the courtroom to selfishly advance their own power and motives," McCrory said.

Spaulding said he welcomed the criticism: "Taxpayer dollars being used for `private' school vouchers is an admission by the governor that he wants to take children out of public schools instead of enhancing our public schools. We should make our public schools so competitive that private school children would be seeking to return to our public schools. The Governor's approach to public education is leading to the re-segregation of our public schools. So no, I will not stop fighting for our public schools and our school teachers."

Source: News-Observer on 2016 North Carolina gubernatorial race Jan 26, 2016

Chris Rey: Read with the Mayor: volunteer program at grade schools

Chris Rey has quickly become a recognized leader on education issues: Soon after his election as Mayor he began his "Read with the Mayor" program that has organized over 150 volunteers to read to grade school children for an hour each week to encourage early grades literacy. He was recently appointed to the board of the North Carolina Public Schools Forum, which started the national recognized Teaching Fellows program, the North Carolina Afterschools Program, and the Educational Policy Fellowship. He also serves on the board of the Fayetteville Tech Foundation, which raises money to keep the community college affordable and teaches criminal justice classes at the University of Mt. Olive.
Source: 2016 North Carolina Senate campaign website ChrisRey.com Sep 22, 2015

Erica Smith: Stop cuts to education; compensate our teachers

Smith's campaign website highlighted her four-point plan:
  1. Re-engineer policy and economic initiatives to ensure that workers can find jobs, fair wages and forward growth;
  2. Create business incentives to attract high tech companies and innovative agricultural technologies to our area.
  3. Stop cuts to education so that our teachers can be adequately compensated for their valiant work and students will have the resources they need to be prepared for 21st century competencies, degrees & careers;
  4. Promote an agenda for public safety and equal protection and opportunity under the law for all citizens of North Carolina.
Source: Ballotpedia.org Connection: 2020 North Carolina Senate race Nov 1, 2014

Mark Walker: Oppose Common Core; empower families through vouchers

Mark Walker is opposed to Common Core, which is an attempt by the Obama Administration to exert more control over public education at the expense of local control.

Our children deserve a world-class education, but the federal government's continued interference has kept us from achieving this goal. Education has traditionally been best dealt with at the local level, and Mark will work to restore state and local power over education.

He will also push for legislation which will empower families by allowing them to exercise educational choice through vouchers which will let funding follow the child to the school of their family's choice.

Source: 2014 North Carolina House campaign website, WalkerForNC.com Oct 10, 2014

Thom Tillis: Department of Education is 5,000 overpaid bureaucrats

On Common Core, the educational standards which have become deeply unpopular among conservative activists, Tillis sounded far more conservative than Jeb Bush [his guest of honor]. The N.C. House approved the standards in 2011 but Tillis backed away from them.

"I'm not willing to settle just for a national standard if we think we can set a new standard and a best practice," Tillis said, pivoting to an attack on the federal Education Department as "a bureaucracy of 5,000 people in Washington" who make an average salary of over $100,000.

While criticizing the Education Department is common among Republicans, Tillis was standing next to the younger brother of President George W. Bush, whose signature accomplishments include No Child Left Behind, the sweeping federal education law run by the department.

Bush sensed the need to play down any differences: "We can argue about what to call these things," he said, but maintained that the focus ought to be on ensuring high standards.

Source: N.Y. Times on 2014 North Carolina Senate debate Sep 24, 2014

Kay Hagan: Repeatedly stressed support for public schools

During a stop last week at a park in a predominantly black neighborhood in north Charlotte, Hagan repeatedly stressed her support for public schools, which were at the center of the legislative standoff in Raleigh. "I think Thom Tillis has the wrong priorities," she said. "I look at his policies in North Carolina, what he has done that has been harmful to North Carolina."

Tillis was not available for an interview, according to his spokesman, who countered that tax cuts and regulatory changes passed by the General Assembly since Republicans gained power in 2010 have boosted middle-class families and small businesses.

Source: Washington Post on 2014 North Carolina Senate race Aug 13, 2014

Thom Tillis: Oppose Common Core; eliminate U.S. Department of Education

Greg Brannon attacked Thom Tillis as softer than him on immigration, health care, education, gun rights and other issues. While mostly playing it safe, Tillis staked out a series of positions on the right that could hurt him in the general election: [including] suggesting that he might want to eliminate the U.S. Department of Education.

All four candidates said they oppose Common Core education standards. Brannon said he believe in no federal and state education standards. "Common Core became law under Thom's watch," he said. "[It] destroyed education with the Department of Education."

Tillis said he opposes Common Core and he identified the U.S. Education Department when asked to identify a federal cabinet agency he would eliminate. "We existed for more than a century without one," said Tillis, offering a nuanced explanation. "That's the first department I'd look at...At some point, I'd wonder whether or not it needs to exist in its current form."

Source: Politico.com on 2014 North Carolina Senate debate Apr 22, 2014

Sean Haugh: Scrap the Common Core curriculum standards

Haugh and D'Annunzio are the first Libertarian candidates for US Senate to appear on a primary ballot in North Carolina. They agree on dramatic cutbacks in government reach, strong Second Amendment rights, staying out of the Russia-Ukraine imbroglio, repealing ObamaCare, and scrapping Common Core curriculum standards, the Patriot Act, and the Federal Reserve. But Haugh and D'Annunzio hold different views on abortion, legalizing drugs, the scope of US military action, and immigration controls.
Source: Carolina Journal on 2014 North Carolina Senate debate Apr 8, 2014

Bev Perdue: $400M federal funds for Ready Set Go! Initiative

A year ago I asked North Carolina to join me in our Career and College Ready Set Go! initiative. We challenged educators at all levels, from kindergarten through community colleges and universities, to focus on one single goal: to prepare all students to graduate ready for a career, college or technical training. North Carolina accepted that challenge with gusto. Then we took it a step further. Using Ready Set Go as our foundation, we applied for federal Race to the Top funds--and we won.

Because we are not afraid to think differently and to demand more from our students and educators, we were recognized nationally as one of only 12 states leading the way in education reform. Career and College Ready Set Go! won us $400 million in federal Race to the Top funds and a spot on the lists of states to watch. So we are resetting state government, and resetting education. And we are also resetting the way we go after businesses--and the jobs they bring.

Source: North Carolina 2011 State of the State Address Feb 14, 2011

George Bush Sr.: Churches & private schools provide 93% of education funding

DUKAKIS: This administration has cut and slashed and cut and slashed programs for children, for nutrition, for the kinds of things that can help these youngsters to live better lives. It's cut federal aid to education; it's cut Pell grants an close the door to college opportunity on youngsters all over this country.

BUSH: The big spending liberals think the only way to do it is for the federal government to do it all. The fact happens to be that education spending is up by the government. But here's the point he misses. The federal government spends 7% of the total on education, and the state governments & local governments & the thousand points of light, and I'm talking about private schools & private church schoo and things of this nature--are putting up 93%. But the federal spending for education is up, and I want to be the education president, because I want to see us do better. And we can do it. But it1s not going to be dedicated by some federal bu

Source: Presidential Debate in Winston-Salem, North Carolina (APP) Sep 25, 1988

  • The above quotations are from State of North Carolina Politicians: secondary Archives.
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2020 Presidential contenders on Education:
  Democrats running for President:
Sen.Michael Bennet (D-CO)
V.P.Joe Biden (D-DE)
Mayor Mike Bloomberg (I-NYC)
Gov.Steve Bullock (D-MT)
Mayor Pete Buttigieg (D-IN)
Sen.Cory Booker (D-NJ)
Secy.Julian Castro (D-TX)
Gov.Lincoln Chafee (L-RI)
Rep.John Delaney (D-MD)
Rep.Tulsi Gabbard (D-HI)
Sen.Amy Klobuchar (D-MN)
Gov.Deval Patrick (D-MA)
Sen.Bernie Sanders (I-VT)
CEO Tom Steyer (D-CA)
Sen.Elizabeth Warren (D-MA)
Marianne Williamson (D-CA)
CEO Andrew Yang (D-NY)

2020 Third Party Candidates:
Rep.Justin Amash (L-MI)
CEO Don Blankenship (C-WV)
Gov.Lincoln Chafee (L-RI)
Howie Hawkins (G-NY)
Gov.Gary Johnson(L-NM)
Howard Schultz(I-WA)
Gov.Jesse Ventura (I-MN)
Republicans running for President:
Sen.Ted Cruz(R-TX)
Gov.Larry Hogan (R-MD)
Gov.John Kasich(R-OH)
V.P.Mike Pence(R-IN)
Gov.Mark Sanford (R-SC)
Pres.Donald Trump(R-NY)
Rep.Joe Walsh (R-IL)
Gov.Bill Weld(R-MA & L-NY)

2020 Withdrawn Democratic Candidates:
Sen.Stacey Abrams (D-GA)
Mayor Bill de Blasio (D-NYC)
Sen.Kirsten Gillibrand (D-NY)
Sen.Mike Gravel (D-AK)
Sen.Kamala Harris (D-CA)
Gov.John Hickenlooper (D-CO)
Gov.Jay Inslee (D-WA)
Mayor Wayne Messam (D-FL)
Rep.Seth Moulton (D-MA)
Rep.Beto O`Rourke (D-TX)
Rep.Tim Ryan (D-CA)
Adm.Joe Sestak (D-PA)
Rep.Eric Swalwell (D-CA)
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