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Val Demings on Crime

 

 


Support police but we also have to deal with social ills

I believe sometimes there are moments before us when we just have to do what we know is right. You know, with politics aside, it may not be the most popular decision. It may not be the best decision for our, quote, "party." But we just do what's right.

Over 50 years ago, President Johnson looked at crime and policing in America. They concluded that we need to hire the brightest and the best policemen. We need to make sure they have the proper training and equipment. But we also need to look at education. We need to look at substandard housing. We need to look at substandard wages. We have got to deal with the social ills that cause decay in communities in the first place.

Source: National Public Radio on 2022 Florida Senate race , Sep 22, 2020

Improve relationships between police & community

During her tenure as Chief of Police Val Demings reduced violent crime in Orlando by 40% She credits this unprecedented success to improved relationships between the police, community leaders, and the public they serve. Chief Demings created innovative programs like Operation Positive Direction, a mentoring program that empowers at-risk students through tutoring, community service, and positive incentives. She also launched Operation Free Palms, a project focusing on rejuvenating Orlando's most crime-ridden housing complex, the Palms Apartments. Collaborating with city officials and faith leaders, this initiative included increasing access to childcare, building playgrounds, a GED program, and job skills training to improve the quality of life in Orlando's most distressed community. Chief Demings will bring this experience to Washington, helping to push policies that will reduce gun violence and create safer neighborhoods.
Source: 2016 Florida House campaign website ValDemings.com , Nov 8, 2016

As Police Chief, 40% drop in violent crime

As Orlando's Police Chief, it was Val's holistic approach and dynamic leadership that lead to a 40% drop in violent crime. Val shepherded the department through the financial crisis and despite budgetary constraints kept the same number of officers on the streets. Chief Demings will bring that same passion and commitment for her community to Congress. She is the clear front-runner to take this seat from red-to-blue.
Source: Campaign website ValDemings.com: 2016-2017 FL-10 House race , Nov 1, 2016

Police work should be about building communities

Asked whether she was a reformer during her time as chief, Demings responded, "Some of my predecessors certainly thought so. They told me that the community-oriented policing programs we were doing had 'nothing to do with police work.' I disagreed. Building fair, safe, strong communities is exactly what police work can and should be."
Source: Politico.com e-zine on 2022 Florida Senate race , Jun 14, 2016

First step: reduce recidivism & mass incarceration.

Demings voted YEA First Step Act

Congressional Summary:

Opposing press release from Rep. Doug LaMalfa (R-CA-1):: The reform sentencing laws in this bill may compromise the safety of our communities. Criminals convicted of violent crimes would have the opportunity to achieve 'low risk' status and become eligible for early release. California already has similar laws in place--Propositions 47 and 57--which have hamstrung law enforcement and caused a significant uptick in crime.

Supporting press release from Rep. Jerrold Nadler (D-NY-10):: S. 756 establishes a new system to reduce the risk that [federal prisoners] will commit crimes once they are released. Critically, S. 756 would not only implement these reforms to our prison system, but it also takes a crucial first step toward addressing grave concerns about our sentencing laws, which have for years fed a national crisis of mass incarceration. The bill is a 'first step' that demonstrates that we can work together to make the system fairer in ways that will also reduce crime and victimization.

Legislative outcome: Concurrence Passed Senate, 87-12-1, on Dec. 18, 2018; Concurrence Passed House 358-36-28, Dec. 20, 2018; President Trump signed, Dec. 21, 2018

Source: Congressional vote 18-S756 on Dec 20, 2018

2021-22 Governor, House and Senate candidates on Crime: Val Demings on other issues:
FL Gubernatorial:
Adam Putnam
Alexander Snitker
Andrew Gillum
Bill Nelson
Charlie Crist
Gwen Graham
Philip Levine
Rick Scott
Ron DeSantis
Wayne Messam
FL Senatorial:
Bill Nelson
Carlos Lopez-Cantera
Charlie Crist
David Jolly
Edward Janowski
Marco Rubio
Pam Keith
Patrick Murphy
Rick Scott
Ron DeSantis
Incoming Republican Freshmen 2021:
AL-1: Jerry Carl(R)
AL-2: Barry Moore(R)
CA-8: Jay Obernolte(R)
CA-50: Darrell Issa(R)
CO-3: Lauren Boebert(R)
FL-3: Kat Cammack(R)
FL-15: Scott Franklin(R)
FL-19: Byron Donalds(R)
GA-9: Andrew Clyde(R)
GA-14: Marjorie Taylor Greene(R)
IA-2: Mariannette Miller-Meeks(R)
IA-4: Randy Feenstra(R)
IL-15: Mary Miller(R)
IN-5: Victoria Spartz(R)
KS-1: Tracey Mann(R)
KS-2: Jake LaTurner(R)
LA-5: Luke Letlow(R)
MI-3: Peter Meijer(R)
MI-10: Lisa McClain(R)
MT-0: Matt Rosendale(R)
NC-11: Madison Cawthorn(R)
NM-3: Teresa Leger Fernandez(D)
NY-2: Andrew Garbarino(R)
NY-22: Claudia Tenney(R)
OR-2: Cliff Bentz(R)
PR-0: Jenniffer Gonzalez-Colon(R)
TN-1: Diana Harshbarger(R)
TX-4: Pat Fallon(R)
TX-11: August Pfluger(R)
TX-13: Ronny Jackson(R)
TX-17: Pete Sessions(R)
TX-22: Troy Nehls(R)
TX-23: Tony Gonzales(R)
TX-24: Beth Van Duyne(R)
UT-1: Blake Moore(R)
VA-5: Bob Good(R)
WI-5: Scott Fitzgerald(R)
Incoming Democratic Freshmen 2021:
CA-53: Sara Jacobs(D)
GA-5: Nikema Williams(D)
GA-7: Carolyn Bourdeaux(D)
HI-2: Kai Kahele(D)
IL-3: Marie Newman(D)
IN-1: Frank Mrvan(D)
MA-4: Jake Auchincloss(D)
MO-1: Cori Bush(D)
NC-2: Deborah Ross(D)
NC-6: Kathy Manning(D)
NY-15: Ritchie Torres(D)
NY-16: Jamaal Bowman(D)
NY-17: Mondaire Jones(D)
WA-10: Marilyn Strickland(D)

Republican takeovers as of 2021:
CA-21: David Valadao(R) defeated T.J. Cox(D)
CA-39: Young Kim(R) defeated Gil Cisneros(D)
CA-48: Michelle Steel(R) defeated Harley Rouda(D)
FL-26: Carlos Gimenez(R) defeated Debbie Mucarsel-Powell(D)
FL-27: Maria Elvira Salazar(R) defeated Donna Shalala(D)
IA-1: Ashley Hinson(R) defeated Abby Finkenauer(D)
MN-7: Michelle Fischbach(R) defeated Collin Peterson(D)
NM-2: Yvette Herrell(R) defeated Xochitl Small(D)
NY-11: Nicole Malliotakis(R) defeated Max Rose(D)
OK-5: Stephanie Bice(R) defeated Kendra Horn(D)
SC-1: Nancy Mace(R) defeated Joe Cunningham(D)
UT-4: Burgess Owens(R) defeated Ben McAdams(D)

Special Elections 2021-2022:
FL-20: replacing Alcee Hastings (D, SPEL Jan. 2022)
LA-2: Troy Carter (R, April 2021)
LA-5: Julia Letlow (R, March 2021)
NM-1: Melanie Stansbury (D, June 2021)
OH-11: replacing Marcia Fudge (D, SPEL Nov. 2021)
OH-15: replacing Steve Stivers (R, SPEL Nov. 2021)
TX-6: replacing Ron Wright (R, SPEL July 2021)
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Page last updated: Jul 04, 2021